NameUNNAMED , F
Spouses
Birth Date11 Jul 1274
Birth PlaceTurnbery Castle, Ayrshire, Scotland
Birth Memoalt: born at Writtle near Chelmsford, England
Death Date7 Jun 1329
Death PlaceCardross, Dumbarton, Dumbartonshire, Scotland
Burial DateJun 1329
Burial PlaceDunfermline, Fife, Scotland
Burial MemoHeart eventually buried at Melrose Abbey, Roxburghshire.
MotherHeiress Marjorie Of Carrick , F (1254-1292)
Unmarried
ChildrenMargaret , F (~1322->1364)
Notes for UNNAMED
(0) King Robert had several illegitimate children:

1. Sir Robert, killed at Dupplin 12 August 1332.
2. Nigel of Carrick, killed at the battle of Durham 17 October 1346.
3. Margaret, who was married to Robert Glen, and was alive 29 February 1363-4
5. Christian of Carrick

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol I , Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 7-8.
------------------------------

Acknowledged illegitimate children by unknown mothers

Sir Robert Bruce, died 1332, Killed at the Battle of Dupplin Moor.
Walter of Odistoun, Predeceased his father.
Margaret Bruce, Married Robert Glen; alive in 1364.
Elizabeth Bruce, Married Sir Walter Oliphant of Aberdalgie and Dupplin.
Christina of Carrick, Alive in 1329.
Sir Neil of Carrick, died 1346, Killed at the Battle of Neville's Cross

Source: Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_the_Bruce
---------------------------------------
Notes for Robert (Spouse 1)
By the Countess Marjorie, Robert had issue

1. Robert, afterwards King Robert I

2. Edward
3. Thomas, was wounded and taken prisoner by Sir Dougal MacDowat Lochryan, and was brought by him to Carlisle Castle, where he was executed by order of King Edward I, 1306-7.
4. Alexander, suffered the same fate at the same time as his brother. It is said he was a learned man, and had been educated at Cambridge, and was Dean of Glasgow.
5. Sir Nigel, sometimes called Neil, described as miles pulcherrime juventutis. …
6. Isobel. She is generally said to have married Sir Thomas Randolph of Strathdon, Great Chamberlain to Alexander III …
7. Mary. She was taken prison in 1306 with her sister Christine, her sister-in-law, Elizabeth, wife of Kin Robert, and her daughter Marjorie. …
8. Christian / Christina, married, first to Gratney, Earl of Mar and secondly to Christopher de Seton. …
9. Matilda or Maud, married, as his second wife, to Hugh, Earl of Ross, about 1308, and died before 1329.
10. Margaret, married to Sir William de Carlyle. They had a grant from Robert I of the lands of Crumzanstoun.

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol II, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 432-5.
------------------------------

After a turbulent interregnum of upwards of nine years, the Crown was seized by Robert I, de Brus, or ‘The Bruce,’ Earl of Carrick and Lord of Annandale:
born at Writtle, near Chelmsford, 11 July 1274;
chosen one of the guardians of the kingdom 19 August 1299;
assumed the sovereignty and was crowned at Scone 27 March 1306.


He finally achieved the independence of Scotland, and after an eventful reign of twenty-three years died at Cardross 7 June 1329, and was buried at Dunfermline.

(1) He married, first, about 1295, Isabella, daughter of Donald, tenth Earl of Mar, by whom he had an only child:

1. Marjorie, who was married to Walter, High Steward of Scotland. She died 2 March 1315-16, leaving one son, who eventually became king as Robert II.

(2) King Robert married, secondly, in 1302, Elizabeth, daughter of Richard de Burgh, Earl of Ulster, who died at Cullen 26 October 1327, and was buried at Dunfermline, by whom he had:

2. Matilda, married to ‘a certain squire’ Thomas Isaac. She died 20 July 1353, and was buried in Dunfermline, leaving two daughters: Joanna, married to John, Lord of Lorn; and Catherine, d.s.p.
3. Margaret, who was married in 1343 to William, Earl of Sutherland, and died some time before November 1347
4. David, afterwards king
5. John, died in childhood.

(0) King Robert had several illegitimate children:

1. Sir Robert, killed at Dupplin 12 August 1332.
2. Nigel of Carrick, killed at the battle of Durham 17 October 1346.
3. Margaret, who was married to Robert Glen, and was alive 29 February 1363-4
5. Christian of Carrick

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol I , Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 7-8.
------------------------------

Name: King Robert the Bruce of Scotland
Father: Robert de Brus
Mother: Marjory Countess of Carrick
Relation to Elizabeth II: 19th great-grandfather
House of: Bruce
Born: July 11, 1274 at Turnberry Castle, Ayrshire
Ascended to the throne: February 10, 1306 aged 31 years
Crowned: March 27, 1306 at Scone Abbey, Perthshire
Married:(1) Isabella of Mar, 1295
Married:(2) Elizabeth de Burgh, 1302
Children: Marjorie, David, John, Matlida, Margaret plus several illegitimate
Died: June 7, 1329, at Cardross, Dumbartonshire, aged 54 years, 10 months, and 26 days
Buried at: Dunfermline Abbey (body) and Melrose Abbey (heart)
Succeeded by: his son David

Source: ROYAL FAMILY HISTORY - http://www.britroyals.com/scots.asp?id=robert1
—————————————————

Robert I
(11 July 1274 – 7 June 1329), popularly known as Robert the Bruce (Medieval Gaelic: Roibert a Briuis; modern Scottish Gaelic: Raibeart Bruis; Norman French: Robert de Brus or Robert de Bruys, Early Scots: Robert Brus), was King of Scots from 1306 until his death in 1329. Robert was one of the most famous warriors of his generation, and eventually led Scotland during the Wars of Scottish Independence against England. He fought successfully during his reign to regain Scotland's place as an independent nation and is today remembered in Scotland as a national hero.

Descended from the Anglo-Norman and Gaelic nobilities, he was a paternal fourth-great grandson of David I. Robert’s grandfather, Robert de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale, was one of the claimants to the Scottish throne during the "Great Cause". As Earl of Carrick, Robert the Bruce supported his family’s claim to the throne and took part in William Wallace’s revolt against Edward I of England. In 1298, Bruce became a Guardian of Scotland alongside his great rival for the Scottish throne, John Comyn, and William Lamberton, Bishop of St. Andrews. Bruce resigned as guardian in 1300 due in part to his quarrels with Comyn but chiefly because the restoration of King John seemed imminent. In 1302, he submitted to Edward I and returned to "the king’s peace". When his father died in 1304, Bruce inherited his family’s claim to the throne. In February 1306, following an argument during a meeting at Greyfriars monastery, Dumfries, Bruce killed Comyn. He was excommunicated by the Pope but absolved by Robert Wishart, Bishop of Glasgow.

Bruce moved quickly to seize the throne and was crowned king of Scots on 25 March 1306, at Scone. Edward I’s forces defeated Robert in battle, and Bruce was forced to flee into hiding in the Hebrides and Ireland before returning in 1307 to defeat an English army at Loudoun Hill and wage a highly successful guerrilla war against the English. Bruce defeated the Comyns and his other Scots enemies, destroying their strongholds and devastating their lands from Buchan to Galloway. In 1309, he held his first parliament at St Andrews, and a series of military victories between 1310 and 1314 won him control of much of Scotland. At the Battle of Bannockburn in June 1314, Bruce defeated a much larger English army under Edward II, confirming the re-establishment of an independent Scottish monarchy. The battle marked a significant turning point, and, freed from English threats, Scotland's armies could now invade northern England; Bruce launched devastating raids into Lancashire and Yorkshire. He also decided to expand his war against the English and create a second front by sending an army under his younger brother, Edward, to invade Ireland, appealing to the native Irish to rise against Edward II's rule.

Despite Bannockburn and the capture of the final English stronghold at Berwick in 1318, Edward II refused to give up his claim to the overlordship of Scotland. In 1320, the Scottish magnates and nobles submitted the Declaration of Arbroath to Pope John XXII, declaring Bruce as their rightful monarch and asserting Scotland’s status as an independent kingdom. In 1324, the Pope recognised Bruce as king of an independent Scotland, and in 1326, the Franco-Scottish alliance was renewed in the Treaty of Corbeil. In 1327, the English deposed Edward II in favour of his son, Edward III, and peace was temporarily concluded between Scotland and England with the Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton, by which Edward III renounced all claims to sovereignty over Scotland.

Robert I died on 7 June 1329. His body is buried in Dunfermline Abbey, while his heart was interred in Melrose Abbey. Bruce's lieutenant and friend Sir James Douglas agreed to take the late King's embalmed heart on crusade to the Lord's Sepulchre in the Holy Land, but he only reached Moorish Granada. Douglas was killed in battle during the siege of Teba while fulfilling his promise. His body and the casket containing the embalmed heart were found upon the field. They were both conveyed back to Scotland by Sir William Keith of Galston.

(1) Child by Isabella of Mar

1. Marjory, born 1296, died 2 March 1316, Married in 1315 Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland, by whom she had one child (Robert II of Scotland)

(2) Children by Elizabeth de Burgh

2. Margaret
, died 1346/47, Married in 1345 William de Moravia, 5th Earl of Sutherland; had son, John (1346-1361).
3. Matilda (Maud), died 1353, Married Thomas Isaac; had two daughters. Buried at Dunfermline Abbey
4. David born 5 March 1324, died 22 February 1371 Succeeded his father as King of Scots. Married (1) in 1328 Joan of England; no issue; married (2) in 1364 Margaret Drummond; no issue.
5. John, born 5 March 1324, died Before 1327, Younger twin brother of David II. Died in infancy.

Acknowledged illegitimate children by unknown mothers

Sir Robert Bruce, died 1332, Killed at the Battle of Dupplin Moor.
Walter of Odistoun, Predeceased his father.
Margaret Bruce, Married Robert Glen; alive in 1364.
Elizabeth Bruce, Married Sir Walter Oliphant of Aberdalgie and Dupplin.
Christina of Carrick, Alive in 1329.
Sir Neil of Carrick, died 1346, Killed at the Battle of Neville's Cross

Robert died on 7 June 1329, at the Manor of Cardross, near Dumbarton. He died utterly fulfilled, in that the goal of his lifetime's struggle – untrammelled recognition of the Bruce right to the crown – had been realised, and confident that he was leaving the kingdom of Scotland safely in the hands of his most trusted lieutenant, Moray, until his infant son reached adulthood. Six days after his death, to complete his triumph still further, papal bulls were issued granting the privilege of unction at the coronation of future Kings of Scots.

Bruce's descendants include all later Scottish monarchs and all British monarchs since the Union of the Crowns in 1603. A large number of families definitely are descended from him.

Source: Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_the_Bruce
---------------------------------------
Last Modified 25 May 2016Created 9 Jan 2017 using Reunion for Macintosh