NameLady Margaret LYON Of Glamis , F
Birth Dateabt 1546
Birth PlaceGlamis Castle, Forfarshire, Scotland
Death Dateaft 21 Apr 1623
Death PlaceHamilton, Clydesdale, Lanarkshire, Scotland
FatherLord John LYON 7th Of Glamis , M (~1521-<1559)
MotherLady Janet KEITH Of Keith , F (~1511-)
Spouses
Birth Dateabt 1541
Birth PlaceCassillis, Ayrshire, Scotland
Death Date12 Dec 1576
Death PlaceCassillis, Ayrshire, Scotland
Marr Dateabt 1566
Marr PlaceCassillis, Ayrshire, Scotland
Marr MemoContract dated 30 Sep 1566
ChildrenJohn , M (~1568-1615)
 Hew , M (~1569-<1607)
Birth Dateabt 1541
Birth PlaceBrodick Castle, Isle Of Arran, Scotland
Death Date6 Apr 1604
Death PlaceHamilton, Clydesdale, Lanarkshire, Scotland
Marr Dateaft 30 Dec 1577
Marr PlaceHamilton, Clydesdale, Lanarkshire, Scotland
Marr MemoContract dated at Maybole 30 Dec 1577.
ChildrenEdward , M (~1580-<1594)
 Margaret , F (~1585-~1609)
 James , M (~1589-1625)
Notes for Lady Margaret LYON Of Glamis
He [Lord John 7th of Glamis] married,with greit trivmpheon 6 February 1543-44, Jean Keith, daughter of Robert, Master of Marischal, and sister of William, fourth Earl Marischal.

She was infeft in Courtastoune and Drumgowan upon a precept under the Quarter Seal 6 February 1543-44. On 24 November 1559, she was kenned to her terce before the Sheriff of Forfar, in the baronies of Glamis, Baky, and Tannadyce, and cavels being cast for the sun and shadow, the lady fell to her cavel at the sun. Concerningher, little is known, only the careers of her sons remain an enduring memorial to her lofty conceptions of duty.

By her, Lord Glamis

had issue:


1. John, eighth Lord Glamis.
2. Sir Thomas … was heir-presumptive to the title, and was known as the Master of Glamis …

3. Margaret, married (contract 30 september 1566), first to Gilbert, fourth Earl of Cassillis, tocher 10,000 merks; secondly (contract 30 December 1577), to John, first Marquess of Hamilton. She died at Evandaill in 1626.

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol VIII, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 281-88.
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The Earl [of Cassillis] was, on 10 July 1546, while very young, contracted to marry Jean Hamilton, daughter of James, Earl of Arran, but that marriage did not take place, as he married (contract 30 September 1566) Margaret, only daughter of John Lyon, seventh Lord Glamis, who survived him.

They had issue:

1. John, fifth Earl of Cassillis.
2. Hew, who, as Master of Cassillis, is named several times in the records of the period. …

She married again (before 12 August 1579) John Hamilton, afterwards first Marquess of Hamilton and had issue.

She was alive 21 April 1623.


Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol II, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 471-75.
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Lord John Hamilton married (contract dated at Maybole 30 December 1577) Margaret, only daughter of John Lyon, seventh Lord Glamis, widow of Gilbert, fourth Earl of Cassillis, who survived her second husband, and was alive on 21 April 1623.

By her Lord Hamilton had issue:

1. Edward, born in England, who died young.
2. James, afterwards second marquess.
3. Margaret, married … to John, ninth Lord Maxwell

Lord John Hamilton had a natural son, John, afterwards Sir John Hamilton of Lettrick (legitimated on 22 December 1600). He married Jean, daughter of Alexander Campbell, Bishop of Brechin, and was father of the first Lord Bargany.

A natural daughter, Margaret, was married, first (contract dated at Hamilton 29 December 1585), to Sir Humfrey Colquhoun of Luss, by whom she had no male issue. Sir Humfrey wal killed in July 1592, and his widow was married, secondly, to Sir John Campbell of Ardkinglas, whom she survived. She was living in 1625.

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol IV, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 370-73
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Notes for Gilbert (Spouse 1)
The [3rd] Earl married Margaret Kennedy, daughter of Alexander Kennedy of Bargany, after the death of her first husband, William Wallace of Craigie, between 1539 and 1541. She survived the Earl, her testament being confirmed 12 January 1596-97.

The Earl had issue:

1. Gilbert, who succeeded as fourth Earl.

2. David, who died an infant.
3. Sir Thomas, of Culzean … From him the present family of Cassillis is descended.
4. Jean, married, in 1561. to Robert Stewart, first Earl of Orkney. He was a natural son of King James V.
5. Katharine, married in 1574 to Sir Patrick Vaus of Barnbarroch, and had issue.

The Earl had also a natural son, John, styled of Grenare, who had a pension of £222 from the benefice of Glenluce.

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol II, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 468-71.
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VI. Gilbert, fourth Earl of Cassillis, sat in the Parliament of 29 November 1558, as Master of Cassillis, but he was apparently under age on 5 November 1559, when his curators ratified certain contracts between him and his mother. He became of age between that date and 15 October 1562, when he was served heir to his father.

He succeeded his father as Chamberlain of Carrick, etc.


He adhered to the Roman Catholic faith, as he was condemned by the General Assembly of the Reformed church on that score, and he continued devoted to the Queen’s service, fought for her at Langside, for which he was forfeited, was still ’stubborn’ after her defeat there, and joined with other nobles in writing letters of devotion and good heart to her after her flight to England.

He held out from complete allegiance to the new Government until the spring of 1571, when he was forced by Lennox at the head of a large force to surrender and suffer imprisonment until about 25 August 1571, when he joined the King’s party, and his forfeiture was not carried out. After Mar became Regent, the Earl continued his support to the Government.

He is said to have been popularly styled the ‘King of Carrick,and he appears to have been a forceful personage. Perhaps on that account he was appointed as his father’s successor in the bailiary of the Abbey of Glunluce, which had been disturbed by John Gordon of Lochinvar, the inmates expelled, and the worship interdicted. The recently appointed abbot, Thomas Hay, and his forlorn comrades were provided for by the Earl in his religious house at Maybole and he also gave a generous donation towards the repair of their abbey. For this he received the bailiary of their lands, and later on tacks of their benefice, at an apparently yearly rental of 1000 merks and other dues, but other writs seem to show that the rent was largely nominal.

But the deed for which the Earl is chiefly remembered is his alleged roasting of Alan Stewart, Abbot of Crossraguel, on a fire in the Black vault of Dunure, and compelling him to sign tacks or charters of the abbey property in favour of the Earl. there can be no doubt the Earl took cruel and violent measures to obtain the abbot’s signature, but a full statement of the case, which is too long to be narrated here, would show that the abbot was playing a double game, and repudiating and altering the destination of the writs and tacks made by his predecessor in favour of the Earl, who in exasperation used extreme means to gain the abbot’s signature.

The muniments, now in the Culzean charter-chest, show that the abbot was not entirely a loser in the transaction. He was however, detained at Dunure for nearly three months, and was at last released in November 1570 through the efforts of Thomas Kennedy of Barbany, who assembled an armed force, and rescued the abbot, who, when at liberty, immediately revoked all he had been forced to do. The Earl was cited before the Privy council, and decerned to find security to let the abbot alone, and also for a sum due to his old preceptor, Mr. George Buchanan.

It may be added that the Earl gained his end in a less extreme manner by an arrangement with James Stewart of Cardonald, to whom Abbot Alan had made tacks with a view to divert the abbey lands from the Earl. The latter paid Steward 3700 merks, and received the charters of the abbey. Later he became, also by purchase, proprietor of the whole of greater part of the abbey lands, which were confirmed to him on 10 January 1575-76.

The Earl did not long survive his acquisition of the Crossraguel regality

dying on 12 December 1576,

the result, it is said, of his horse falling with him.
By his will he appointed his brother-in-law, John, Lord Glamis, tutor to his son, a boy of eight years old.

The Earl was, on 10 July 1546, while very young, contracted to marry Jean Hamilton, daughter of James, Earl of Arran, but that marriage did not take place, as he married (contract 30 September 1566) Margaret, only daughter of John Lyon, seventh Lord Glamis, who survived him. She married again (before 12 August 1579) John Hamilton, afterwards first Marquess of Hamilton and had issue. She was alive 21 April 1623.

They had issue:

1. John, fifth Earl of Cassillis.
2. Hew, who, as Master of Cassillis, is named several times in the records of the period. …

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol II, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 471-75.
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Notes for John (Spouse 2)
He [Earl James] married, about 23 September 1532, Margaret, eldest daughter of James Douglas, third Earl of Morton. she survived her husband and was still alive in 1579.

By her he had issue:


1. James, Lord Hamilton, Earl of Arran, who was born in 1537 or 1538, as he was under twenty-three on 15 April 1560 …
2. Gavin, styled son son in two charters, both dated 22 October 1542. …

3. John, afterwards first Marquess of Hamilton.

4. David, described in 1547 as third son of the Regent … born appparently in the end of 1542 …
5. Claud, aged fourteen in March 1560, according to Randolph but probably older …
6. Barbara, the eldest daughter … married to James, Lord Fleming, chamberlain of Scotland.
7. Jean or Jane, … married … the Earl of Eglinton.
8. Anne … married … George, Lord Gordon, afterwards fifth Earl of Huntly.

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol IV, Edinburgh, 1906, p. 368.
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IV. John, usually known as John, Lord Hamilton, was the next actual possessor of the Hamilton estates, or at least was the recognised head of the Hamiltons after his father’s death, owing to his elder brother’s mental incapacity.

At a comparatively early age, he was provided to the abbacy of Inchaffray, the Consistorial act in his favour being dated 28 November 1547, when he is said to be aged twelve. But his age is variously stated, the date of his birth being assigned by some to 1533 and by others in 1538, which was most probably the birth year of his eldest brother. There is good reason to believe that Lord John was born not long before October 1542, when he is first named in a charter. He was still under age on 12 April 1560, but he declares in a writ of 26 April 1564 that he was then above the age of twenty-one.

In 1551, he resigned Inchaffray, and was on 4 September of that year provided to the rich and extensive abbacy of Arbroath. He is styled Commendator shortly afterwards, and held the lands until their annexation to the Crown, though his possession was much disturbed by George Douglas, a natural son of the sixth Earl of Angus, who claimed the abbacy as a postulate. Some time before March 1570, Douglas obtained possession of the abbey and held it with a strong hand, and Hamilton subsidised James, Lord Ogilvy, and his adherents to aid in regaining the place and to defend it when taken, on his behalf.

He, like all his family, was a devoted partisan of Queen Mary, and suffered the loss of much property in her cause. Latterly he was involved in the forfeiture of the Hamilton estates in 1579, when his own possessions of Arbroath were affected and he fled to England, it is said, in a seaman’s dress, and thence to France. He remained there a short time, afterwards joining his brother, Claud, in the north of England, where they resided until 1585.

The ascendancy of James Stewart of Bothwellmuir, who had been created Earl of Arran on the resignation of that title in his favour by the insane Earl, came to an end in that year, as those who had suffered from his rapacity succeeded, with the aid of Queen Elizabeth, in overthrowing his government.

The Hamiltons became reconciled to the Earl of Angus, then also in exile, and they, with him and other lords, with Elizabeth’s permission, entered Scotland and marched with a considerable force to Stirling, where King James Vi and Arran were. The latter fled, and the banished lords were, on 4 November 1585, admitted to the King’s presence, who, it is said, though they had not previously met, welcomed Lord John with a special cordiality as a faithful servant of his mother.

Lord John speedily rose high in the King’s favour. At a Parliament held in December 1585 at Linlithgow, he was restored to his estates and appointed Keeper of the Castle of Dumbarton, with an additional pension of 550 Merks. He was a staunch Protestant, but it is said his devotion to Queen Mary led him to favour the Spanish invasion in 1588, as a revenge on England for her death.

The King was a frequent correspondent and wrote freely to Lord John, evidently holding him in high friendship. None of the letters preserved are of great importance, but they show the King at his best, and some of them deal with sport, one at least being a special appeal to Lord John to come to his aid in a challenge for the ‘honoure of Scotland’ against Lord Home, who has ’nyne couple of fleing feinds.’ He requests Lord John to lend him a few of his ‘fleetest and fairest running houndis,’ also a good horse, that ‘with Goddis grace, the Englishe tykes shall be dung doun.’

In 1597, the King, in consideration of the services of Lord John and his family, and the loss they had sustained of the French duchy of Chatelherault (the value of which is stated as thirty thousand francs yearly), granted to him the temporalities of the abbacy of Arbroath, and continued the grant to his son.

On 15 April 1599, he was present at Holyrood at the baptism of the Princess Margaret, and was then made a Peer. Two days later, on 17 April, he and the Earl of Huntly were, with great ceremony, in ‘His Majesty’s great chamber’ at Holyrood installed in their proper places, his title being proclaimed as MARQUESS OF HAMILTON, EARL OF ARRAN, and LORD EVAN.

He survived his honours a few years, dying 6 April 1604, his last act being to commend his son to the King’s favour.

Very shortly before his death, he bound over his nephew, James, Lord Abercorn, to secure the interests of his unfortunate brother, the Earl of Arran, who was still alive.

Lord John Hamilton married (contract dated at Maybole 30 December 1577) Margaret, only daughter of John Lyon, seventh Lord Glamis, widow of Gilbert, fourth Earl of Cassillis, who survived her second husband, and was alive on 21 April 1623.

By her Lord Hamilton had issue:

1. Edward, born in England, who died young.
2. James, afterwards second marquess.
3. Margaret, married … to John, ninth Lord Maxwell

Lord John Hamilton had a natural son, John, afterwards Sir John Hamilton of Lettrick (legitimated on 22 December 1600). He married Jean, daughter of Alexander Campbell, Bishop of Brechin, and was father of the first Lord Bargany.

A natural daughter, Margaret, was married, first (contract dated at Hamilton 29 December 1585), to Sir Humfrey Colquhoun of Luss, by whom she had no male issue. Sir Humfrey wal killed in July 1592, and his widow was married, secondly, to Sir John Campbell of Ardkinglas, whom she survived. She was living in 1625.

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol IV, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 370-73
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