NameUNNAMED , F
Spouses
Birth Dateabt 1538
Birth PlaceInveraray, Argyll, Scotland
Death Date12 Sep 1573
Death PlaceInveraray, Argyll, Scotland
Death Memo“Died of the stone.”
MotherLady Helen HAMILTON Of Arran , F (~1521-<1541)
Unmarried
ChildrenColin , M (~1569-)
 Jean , F (~1570-)
 John , M (~1571-)
 A. C. , M (~1573-)
 Elspeth , F (~1574-)
Notes for UNNAMED
The Earl [Archibald] left several illegitimate children:

1. John, who was Provost of the collegiate church of Kilmum
2. Colin, named by Lady Jean Stewart … in bringing an action for reduction of the divorce …
3. Another son, described as A.C., is also said to have been baptized and educated at the Earl’s expense.
4. Jean, said to be Colin’s sister, named in her uncle’s will …
5. Elspeth, also named in her uncle’s will.

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol I, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 340-44.
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Notes for Archibald (Spouse 1)
(1) [Archibald the 4th] Earl married, first, Helen, eldest daughter of James Hamilton, first Earl of Arran, about 1529, by whom

he had a son:

1. Archibald, fifth Earl of Argyll.


(2) He married, secondly, 21 April 1541, at the Priory of Inchmahome, Margaret, only [sic] daughter of William Graham, third Earl of Menteith, by whom

he had issue:

2. Colin, sixth Earl of Argyll, born before 1546.
3. Margaret, who was married 11 January 1563-64 to James, Lord Doune and St. Colme, son of sir James Stewart of Belth, Commendator of St. Colme’s Inch, ancestor of the Earls of Moray. He died 20 July 1590
4. Janet, married to Hector Maclean of Dowart, and had issue.

(3) He married, thirdly, Katherine Maclean, mentioned in a charter of 22 January 1546-47, and had no issue by her.

The Earl had a natural son, Colin, who married the heiress of the sixth Laird of Barbreck, and was father of Colin, eighth laird. He witnessed a deed in 1575.

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol I, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 338-40
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V. Archibald, fifth Earl of Argyll, born about 1538, is designed son and heir-apparent of Archibald, Earl of Argyll, in six charters, granted to him on 22 October 1542, of:

1. Lands in the counties of Edinburgh, Perth, Fife and Clackmannan;
2. The baronies of Lochow, Glenurch, Over cowall, lands of Strachur, Etcl, in Argyll, and the barony of Tarbert, etc.;
3. Abernethy;
4. Lordship and barony of Lorne, and islands, Kilmun, Dunoon, etc.;
5. Lands in Cowall; and
6. The hereditary offices for Argyll, Lorne, Knapdale, and Kintyre; and

on 23 and 15 December 1558, he got three charters, ‘to Archibald, now Earl of Argyll, son of Archibald, late Earl of Argyll,’ of the land of Balloch, in Dumbartonshire, and Craigneilston, in the county of Renfrew.

He was educated under Mr. John Douglas, the first Protestant Archbishop of St. Andrews.

In 1558 the Earl and James, Prior of St. Andrews (afterwards the Regent Moray), were empowered to carry the crown matrimonial to Francis, Dauphin of France, husband of Queen Mary, but refused to do it. The Earl also adhered to the party of the Queen-mother, and in May 1559 was one of her commissioners for conducting a negotiation with the Lords of the congregation, and concluded the Treaty of Perth with them. He and Moray, however, afterwards openly joined the Congregation, and Argyll took a principal part in the subsequent transactions, in obtaining the assistance of Queen Elizabeth, and obliging the French troops to leave Scotland.

On the arrival of queen Mary in Scotland (19 August 1561) the Earl was sworn a Privy Councillor, and was so much in her Majesty’s favour that she passed a part of the summer of 1563 at Inveraray in the sport of deer-hunting. In her letters she calls him brother, and signs herself ‘your richt good sister and best friend for ever.

His Lordship opposed the match of the Queen to Lord Darnley, 1565, but Mary was so active in her measures, and prompt in mustering an armed force, that her opponents were obliged to take refuge in England; they, however, were received again into favour, and the processes of treason against them discharted, 1566.

The Queen ordered lodgings to be provided for the Earl of Argyll next to her own, in the Castle of Edinburgh, when she went there to be confined. The Earl was not, however, present at the christening of her son James VI on account of the popish ceremonies; but his lady stood sponsor, as proxy for Queen Elizabeth, and held the child at the font. For this scandal, as it was called, she was cited before the General Assembly, and submitting to discipline, was enjoined to make such publick pennance in the Chapel of Stirling, as the superintendent of Lothian should appoint, and which, without all doubt, she underwent.

On the unfortunate marriage of Mary with Bothwell, Argyll was one of the noblemen who entered into a bond of association, 1567, for the defence of King James VI, and carried the sword of state at his coronation, 29 July of that year. He was present at the Parliament held by the Earl of Moray, as regent, 15 December 1567. But, thinking the Queen hardly deat with, in being kept a prisoner, the Earl of Argyll entered into the association for procuring her Majesty’s liberty on reasonable conditions and signed the bond to that effect, 8 May 1568. He received a commission from the Queen as Lieutenant-general of her forces, dated at Hamilton, on the very day of the battle of Langside, 13 May 1568.

Just as the armies were beginning to engage, his lordship was seized with a swooning fit, which probably contributed not a little to the defeat of Mary’s forces. After this, Argyll retired to his own county and refused to submit to the Regent, but at length, in April 1569, made his peace with Moray on easy terms.

After the assassination of the Regent, the Earl and other noblemen of the Queen’s party assembled at Linlithgow, 10 April 1570, and, along with the Duke of Chatelherault and the Earl of Huntly, was constituted one of her Majesty’s liertenants in Scotland. in 1571 he was prevailed on by the Regent Lennox to submit to the King’s authority, and to appear in the Parliament at Stirling, in September. He attended, and after the murder of Lennox n the fourth of that month, Argyll was a candidate for the regency, but the choice fell on the Earl of Mar, and Argyll was sworn a privy councillor, 7 September 1571.

On the promotion of the Earl of Morton to the regency, vacant by the death of Mar, in November 1572, the office of Lord High Chancellor was given to the Earl of Argyll, who thereupon obtained a charter under the Great Seal, of that office for all the days of his life, 17 January 1572-73, wherein he is styled ‘Archibald, Earl of Argyll, Lord campbell and Lorn, our Justice-General.’

He held that office till his death, of the stone, 12 September 1573, aged about forty-three years. … He died intestate, his brother Colin being his executor.

(1) He married, first (contract dated 5 July 1553), Jean, natural daughter of King James V by Elisabeth Betune, daughter of Sir John Bethune of Creich, and they were married before 3 October 1561. She was at supper with her sister, Queen Mary, when Rizzio was murdered, 9 March 1566. The Earl and she were separated for a time. At least a decree of adherence was pronounced against her on 28 January 1571-72, and she was finally divorced on 22 June 1573. Dying without issue, she was buried in the royal vault in the abbey of Holyrood House.

(2) He married, secondly (contract dated 8 August 1573), Jonet or Jane Cunningham, second daughter of Alexander, fifth Earl of Glencairn, but had no issue by her, who afterwards became the wife of Humphrey colquhous of Luss, and died within a year and a half of her marriage, before 6 January 1584-85.

The Earl left several illegitimate children:

1. John, who was Provost of the collegiate church of Kilmum
2. Colin, named by Lady Jean Stewart … in bringing an action for reduction of the divorce …
3. Another son, described as A.C., is also said to have been baptized and educated at the Earl’s expense.
4. Jean, said to be Colin’s sister, named in her uncle’s will …
5. Elspeth, also named in her uncle’s will.

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol I, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 340-44.
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