NameEarl John SUTHERLAND 7th Of Sutherland , M
Birth Dateabt 1383
Birth PlaceDunrobin, Sutherland, Scotland
Death Date1460
Burial Date1460
Burial PlaceGolspie, Sutherland, Scotland
Burial MemoSt. Andrew’s Church
Spouses
Death Datebef 19 May 1510
Death Memobefore Whitsunday 1510
Marr Dateabt 1426
Marr PlaceDunrobin, Sutherland, Scotland
ChildrenAlexander , M (~1427-<1456)
 John , M (1435-1508)
 Nicolas , M (~1438-)
 Robert , M (~1443-)
 Thomas “Beg” , M (~1446-)
 Janet , F (~1448-)
2UNNAMED , F
ChildrenThomas “Mor” , M (~1410-)
Notes for Earl John SUTHERLAND 7th Of Sutherland
He [Earl Robert] married Margaret Stewart, daughter of Alexander, earl of Buchan,

and had issue:

1. John, seventh Earl of Sutherland

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol VIII, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 329-30
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VII. John, seventh Earl of Sutherland, is first named as taking part, as one of the retinue of his uncle Alexander Stewart, Earl of Mar, in the latter’s campaign in Flanders about 1408
. Wyntoun, a contemporary, tells how the Earl, before an expected battle, knighted some of his esquires, one of these being John of Sutherland,his newew, a lord apperand of vertew, Heretabil Erl of that countre.’ The young knight fought bravely, and the cause the Earl favoured was victorious.

Nothing further is recorded of him until 1427, when it was probably he who went to England as one of the hostages for King James I. He remained in England for many years, being confined in Pontefract Castle, where there were many other Scots hostages. While there, on 12 July 1444, he granted to his kinsman, Alexander Sutherland of Duffus, a charter confirming the lands of Torboll.

On 3 February 1444-45 a safe-conduct was issued to Margaret Sutherland, Alexander and Robert Sutherland, probably the Earl’s wife and children, for a year, to pass between England and Scotland. He must have been liberated not very long after, as he was at Dunrobin Castle in May 1448, when he presented a chaplain to the chapel of St. Andrew at Gospie.

On 29 April 1451, he and his wife, Margaret, received a crown charter of Crakaig, Easter and Wester Loth, and other lands in the parish of Loth. These lands were reserved for liferent use to himself and his Countess when he resigned his earldom into the hands of King James II in favour of his son, John, who was infeft in the lands in his father’s lifetime.

This Earl is said by Sir Robert Gordon to have died in 1460, and to have been buried in the chapel of St Andrew at Golspie.*

He married Margaret Baillie, perhaps a daughter or sister of one of the Earl’s fellow-hostages at Pontefract, Sir William Baillie of Hoprig and Lamington.

She is said to have been a woman of great beauty. She survived the Earl, and contrary to what Sir Robert Gordon asserts, appears to have remained a widow. She was alive on 30 April 1509, but died before Whitsunday of 1510.

Earl John had issue:

1. Alexander, Master of Sutherland, who is named as such in a charter by Alexander, Earl of Ross, granted at Inverness 10 October 1444. It is apparently he who is named in the safe-conduct of 3 February 1444-45, already cited, but he must have died before February 1455-56, when his father resigned the earldom to his brother, John.
2. John, who became eight Earl of Sutherland.
3. Nicholas, named by the Earl in a charter of May 1448 as his son
4. Thomas, known as Thomas Beg (i.e. little), of whom nothing has been found except in the pages of Sir Robert Gordon, who states that he was the ancestor of a family of sutherland in Strathullie.
5. Robert, named in the above safe-conduct of 3 February 1444-45, may have been a son, and not improbably he was the Robert sutherland, who according to Sir Robert Gordon, took part in the battle of Aldycharrish. sir robert Says he was an uncle of the Earl, but if he were, he must have been of great age in 1487, the alleged dat of the conflict.
6 Janet, said by Sir Robert Gordon to be the eldest, but apparently the only daughter of the Earl, was married, it is said in 1480 to Alexander Sunbar, third son of sir. Alexander Dunbar of Westfield, and brother of Sir James dunbar of cumnock, and of Gavin Dunbar, bishop of Aberdeen. Alexander Dunbar had the lands of Altcash Kilcomkil, and others. He was murdered between 25 and 31 March 1498, by Alexander Sutherland of Daldred or dirlot, who was executed for the crime. His wife survived till 1511 or 1512, when her terce was paid to her, but nothing is known of her after that date. She was, by Alexander Dunbar, mother of James Dunbar of Conze, and the ancestress of the Dunbars of Kilbulac, Mochrum, Asleisk, Northfield and others.

The Earl had also, it is said, a natural son, known as Thomos Mor, who had issue two sons, who were killed by their uncle Earl John.

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol VIII, Edinburgh, 1906, p.332.
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*St. Andrew’s Parish Church, Golspie, Sutherland, Scotland.

The Earl of Sutherland built the Chapel of Sanct Andrew for the use of his family in the thirteenth century.

important local events, such as the signing of documents, took place there as well as services, and many are recorded in the History of the Earldom of Sutherland, written by Sir Robert Gordon in 1639. The chapel became the Parish Church in 1619, replacing the one at Culmally Kirkton, two miles to the West which had become ruinous.

St. Andrew’s itself had become unsafe by 1736, and it was completely rebuilt in 1737-39. It gained its south transept in 1751, partly to supporr the bulging long wall, but also to increase the seating capacity. The belfry was added in 1774, and the porch in 1849.

There are many early burials in the churchyard, but few are dated or named; the inscriptions start at about 1700.

The interior of the church is graced by a superb canopied pulpit, dated 1738, and the Sutherland Loft of 1739, both carved by Kenneth Sutherland, who was the carpenter at Dunrobin. The loft is signed by him.

Source: Church History, St. Andrew’s Parish Church - http://www.standrewsgolspie.org/churchhistory.asp
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Notes for Earl John SUTHERLAND 7th Of Sutherland
John, seventh Earl of Sutherland, is first named as taking part, as one of the retinue of his uncle Alexander Stewart, Earl of Mar, in the latter’s campaign in Flanders about 1408. Wyntoun, a contemporary, tells how the Earl before an expected battle, knighted some of his esquires, one of these being John Sutherland ‘his newew, a lord apperand of vertew, heretabil Erl of that coountre.’ The young knight fought bravely, and the cause the Earl favoured was victorious.

Nothing further is recorded of him until 1427, when it was probably he who went to England as one of the hostages for King James I. He remained in England for many years, being confined in Pontefract Castle, where there were many other Scots Hostages. While there, on 12 July 1444, he granted to his kinsman, Alexander Sutherland of Duffus, a charter confirming the lands of Torboll.

On 3 February 1444-45 a safe-conduct was issued to Margaret Sutherland, Alexander and Robert Sutherland, probably the Earl’s wife and children, for a year to pass between England and Scotland. He must have been liberated not very long after, as he was at Dunrobin Castle in May 1448, when he presented a chaplain to the chapel of St. Andrew at Golspie.

On 29 April 1451, he and his wife, Margaret, received a crown charter of Crakaig, Easter and Wester Loth, and other lands in the parish of Loth. These lands were reserved for liferent use to himself and his Countess when he resigned his earldom into the hands of King James II in favour of his son John, who was infeft in the lands in his father’s lifetime.

This Earl is said by Sir Robert Gordon to have died in 1460, and to have been buried in the chapel of St. Andrew at Golspie.

He married Margaret Baillie, perhaps a daughter of sister of one of the Earl’s fellow hostages at Pontefract, Sir William Baillie of Hoprig and Lamington. She is said to have been a woman of great beauty. She survived the Earl, and, contrary to what Sir Robert Gordon asserts, appears to have remained a widow. She was alive on 30 april 1509, but died before Whitsunday of 1510.

Earl John had issue:

1. Alexander, Master of Sutherland, who is named as such in a charter by Alexander, Earl of Ross, granted at Inverness, 10 October 1444. It is apparently he who is named in the safe-conduct of 3 February 1444-45, already cited, but he must have died before February 1455-56, when his father resigned the earldom to his brother John.
2. John, who became eighth Earl of Sutherland.
3. Nicolas, named by the Earl in a charter of May 1448 as his son.
4. Thomas, known as Thomas Beg (i.e. little), of whom nothing has been found except in the pages of Sir Robert Gordon, who states that he was the ancestor of a family of Sutherland in Strathullie
5. Robert, named in the above safe-conduct of 3 february 1444-45, may have been a son, and not improbably he was the Robert Sutherland who, according to Sir Robert Gordon, took part in the battle of Aldycharrish. Sir Robert says he was an uncle of the Earl, but if he were he must have been of great age in 1487, the alleged date of the conflict.
6. Janet, said by Sir Robert Gordon to be the eldest, but apparently the only, daughter of the Earl, was married, it is said, in 1480, to Alexander Dunbar, third son of Sir Alexander Dunbar of Westfield, and brother of Sir James dunbar of cumnock and of gavin Dunbar, Bishop of Aberdeen. Alexander Dunbar had the lands of altcash, Kilcolmkill, and others. He was murdered between 25 and 31 March 1498, by Alexander Sutherland of Daldred or dirlot, who was executed for the crime. His wife survived till 1511 or 1512, when her terce was paid to her, but nothing is known of her after that date. She was, by alexander dunbar, mother of Jamed Dunbar of Conze, and the ancestress of the Dunbars of Kilbuiac, Mochram, Asleisk, Northfield and others.

The Earl had also, it is said, a natural son, known as Thomas Mor, who had issue two sons, who were killed by their uncle John..

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol VIII, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 330-2.
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Notes for Margaret (Spouse 1)
He [John] married Margaret Baillie, perhaps a daughter of sister of one of the Earl’s fellow hostages at Pontefract, Sir William Baillie of Hoprig and Lamington. She is said to have been a woman of great beauty. She survived the Earl, and, contrary to what Sir Robert Gordon asserts, appears to have remained a widow. She was alive on 30 April 1509, but died before Whitsunday of 1510.

Earl John had issue:

1. Alexander, Master of Sutherland, who is named as such in a charter by Alexander, Earl of Ross, granted at Inverness, 10 October 1444. It is apparently he who is named in the safe-conduct of 3 February 1444-45, already cited, but he must have died before February 1455-56, when his father resigned the earldom to his brother John.
2. John, who became eighth Earl of Sutherland.
3. Nicolas, named by the Earl in a charter of May 1448 as his son.
4. Thomas, known as Thomas Beg (i.e. little), of whom nothing has been found except in the pages of Sir Robert Gordon, who states that he was the ancestor of a family of Sutherland in Strathullie
5. Robert, named in the above safe-conduct of 3 february 1444-45, may have been a son, and not improbably he was the Robert Sutherland who, according to Sir Robert Gordon, took part in the battle of Aldycharrish. Sir Robert says he was an uncle of the Earl, but if he were he must have been of great age in 1487, the alleged date of the conflict.
6. Janet, said by Sir Robert Gordon to be the eldest, but apparently the only, daughter of the Earl, was married, it is said, in 1480, to Alexander Dunbar, third son of Sir Alexander Dunbar of Westfield, and brother of Sir James dunbar of cumnock and of gavin Dunbar, Bishop of Aberdeen. Alexander Dunbar had the lands of altcash, Kilcolmkill, and others. He was murdered between 25 and 31 March 1498, by Alexander Sutherland of Daldred or dirlot, who was executed for the crime. His wife survived till 1511 or 1512, when her terce was paid to her, but nothing is known of her after that date. She was, by alexander dunbar, mother of Jamed Dunbar of Conze, and the ancestress of the Dunbars of Kilbuiac, Mochram, Asleisk, Northfield and others.

The Earl had also, it is said, a natural son, known as Thomas Mor, who had issue two sons, who were killed by their uncle John..

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol VIII, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 330-2.
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