NameSir Knight Banneret William STEWART Of Jedworth & Tevidale , M
Birth Dateabt 1364
Birth PlaceDarnley, Glasgow, Scotland
Death DateSep 1402
Death PlaceNorthumberland, England
Death MemoCaptured at the Battle of Homildon Hill then executed by ‘Hotspur’ Percy.
FatherSir Alexander STEWART Of Darnley , M (~1336-~1405)
MotherLady TURNBULL Of Turnbull , F (~1342-~1380)
Spouses
Death Dateaft 1420
ChildrenJohn , M (~1381-1420)
Notes for Sir Knight Banneret William STEWART Of Jedworth & Tevidale
Sir Alexander had issue:

1. John, his heir, first Lord of Aubigny

2. Sir William Stewart. …

3. Alexander Stewart of Torbane and Galstoun …
4. Robert Stewart of Newtoun …
5. James
6. Janet, married in 1391 to Thomas de somerville …

7. William Stewart, who alone, from the dates, can be said to be a son of Janet Keith …

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol V, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 345-6
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Sir William Stewart. The difficult question of his affiliation is also dealt with in the article ‘Galloway.’

He was certainly a nephew of Sir John Turnbull of Minto, and if it can be shown that he was a brother of John, first Lord of Aubigny, this, of course, would help to prove who the latter’s mother was.

He was ancestor of the family of Stewart of Garlies, now Earls of Galloway, and his affiliation becomes of importance on account of the claim of his descendants to the headship of the Stewarts on the extinction of the male line of the Earls of Lennox by the death of Henry, Cardinal York, 13 july 1807.

It is not certainly known who his wife was, but her Christian name was apprently isabel. This appears from a Commission, on 13 November 1400, by Kent Henry IV, to inquire into the report that William, Stewart of Scotland, Knight, and Isabel, his wife, sometime the wife of Richard Oliver, ‘chivaler,’ and Robert, Richard’s son, have for no small time been adherents of the Scots, whereby all their lands and goods are forfeited, etc.

This writ may explain the cause which brought about Sir William’s tragic fate after Homildon Hill.

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol V, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 345-6
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The Stewarts of Garlies, Earls of Galloway, descend from Sir John Stewart, commonly called ‘of Bonkyl,’ through his second son, Sir Alan (in the male line) and his fourth son, Sir Walter (in the female line) …

Sir Alexander Stewart of Darnley, grandson of the above Sir Alan, married, first, _____ Turnbull, sister of Sir John Turnbull of Minto ‘out wyth swerd’;

and secondly, after 1381, Janet Keith, daughter of Sir William Keith of Galston, and widow of Sir David Hamilton of Cadzow.

By his first marriage he had:

1. Sir John (afterwards of Darnley), constable of the Scots Army in France 1420-29.

2. Sir William, ancestor of the Earls of Galloway.

3. Alexander.
4. Robert.
5. James.
6. Janet.

7. William, probably the issue of the second marriage, as he was apparently a very young man who had only reached the rank of ‘escuyer,’ or esquire, when he was killed at Orleans in 1429.

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol IV, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 145.
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Sir William Stewart.

The affiliation of Sir William the second son of Sir Alexander, has been disputed by some genealogists, and the question is more than usually important, as on it depends the title of heir-male of the House of Stewart.

On this account, Andrew Stuart of Torrance (one of the historians of the Stewarts), a rival candidate for the honour, sought to impose on the Stewarts of Garlies an entirely different origin, ascribing their male ancestry to a John le Seneschal of Jedworth, whose name occurs among the signatories to the Ragman Roll in 1296, and who, from inability to identify him otherwise, has been assumed by most genealoogists to be identical with Sir John Stewart of Bonkyl, already named. But ‘John le Seneschal of Jedworthwas not a knight, which Sir John Stewart of Bonkyl unquestionably was, being so designated in the Roll, while the Seneschal of Jedworth is not. John le Seneschal of Jedworth signes the Roll admidst a mixed multitude from the county of Roxburgh, while Sir John Stewart’s name occupies the second place, immediately after that of his brother, the High Stewart himself. In the Roll, John le Seneschal shares the designation ‘of Jedworth’ with Guy le Clerk of Jedworth, Richard Fossart of Jedworth, and Henry Braceor of Jedworth, while Sir John Stewart’s only title is ‘brother of Sir James the Stewart.’ In fact, the whole designation points to an office (of which there are numerous instances in the Roll), not to a surname, since the Patronymic Stewart is always latinised in the Roll as Senescal or Senescalli — never Seneschal — and the substitution of ‘of’ for the territorial ‘de’ in this case still further emphasises the point.

Further, the arms of Sir John Stewart, the eldest son of Sir Alexander Stewart of Darnley (as proved by his seal in the French Record Office, and reproduced by Andrew Stuart in his Genealogy of the Stewarts), were a fesse chequy, surmounted of a bend dexter, while the arms of Sir William Stewart were a fesse chequy surmonted of a bend dexter, engrailed, to mark the younger son. The crest of Sir John Stewart was a ‘bull’s head erased,’ marking his descent maternally from the ancient Border family of Turnbull, who bore that cognizance. The actual crest of Sir William Stewart is not known, but he is called ‘nephew’ by Sir John Turnbull of Minto in a deed afterwards referred to. Sir John Stewart who bore the Turnbull cognizance, and Sir William Stewart who was the Turnbull’s nephew, must therefore have been related maternally as well as paternally, and as Sir John was certainly Sir Alexander’s eldest son, Sir William must also have been a son. Further, Matthew Stuart, Earl of Lennox (the descendant of Sir John), in a letter to the Earl of Shrewsbury, terms Sir Alexander Stewart of Garlies (the descendant of Sir William) his ‘near kinsman,’ while Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley, and his son, King James VI also aknowledged the Stewarts of Garlies as cadets of their own house of Lennox. These facts will be cited in dealing with the individual descendants.


Sir William Stewart, the first offshoot from the house of Darnley, was one of the most prominent Scotsmen of his own or any other day. He figures in the national records as soldier, statesman, administrator, and a loyal and faithful servant to King and country, from 1385 to 1402. He aided James, Earl of Douglas, to expel the English finally from Teviotdale and the Borders, was one of the Scottish leaders subsidised from France in 1385, and is named by Froissart, the French historian, as one of Douglas’s captains at the Battle of Otterburn in 1388.

He bore the coveted distinction of Knight Banneret, a dignity then only conferred for signal bravery under the Royal Standard displayed in battle.

Among the civil offices and appointments held by this famous knight were:

- Clerk of the Audit for the King from 1390 to 1402,
- Sheriff of Teviotdale (and probably also of ‘Forests’ of Tweeddale),
- Ambassador to England,
- Scots Commissioner for a truce, and
- Conservator of the Peace on the Borders.

He was also a member of both the General and Special Councils of the kingdom, and one of the ‘wyse men and leal’ appointed to act as the executive, or cabinet, during the Regency of David, Duke of Rothesay. For his great services he was rewarded by the King, who styles him ‘dilectus et fidelis,’ with a grant of the lands of Synlaws and Merbottil (Roxburghshire) on 2 July 1385, and part of the lands of Minto 8 November 1392. He also received various hereditary pensions between 1390 and 1398, one, on 27 March 1392, bearing to be to ‘our dear and faithful Sir William Stewart of Jedworth, Knight, for special service and retinue to us and to David Stewart our heir.’

From Archibald, Earl of Douglas, he got the lands and Castle of Abercorn in Linlithgowshire on 28 October 1398, while on 4 January 1390-91 he had confirmation of a charter in which his uncle, Sir John Turnbull of Minto ‘out wyth swerd’ made him a grant of his lands of Minto. In that charter he is styled Sir William Stewart of Jedworth, Knight, and ‘nepos’ (or nephew) of the granter.

He appears on record usually under the simple designation of ’Sir William Stewart,’ being then apparently too well known to require any more definite description and is the first of the race to figure in the national records under the now familiar name of Stewart, instead of the old Latin Senecalli or Senescal. At other times the titles ‘de jedworth,’de Tevidale,’ and ‘de Foresta’ are given him. The first was no doubt derived from the lands of Jedworth, part of the Douglas Patrimony, on which Sir William Stewart seems to have been stationed by his friend the Earl of Douglas as an outpost to guard against the raids of the Percies who pretended a right to these and other Douglas lands on the Borders, in virtue of grants from the English sovereigns.

The title ‘de Tevidale’ evidently originated in his office of Sheriff, but that of ‘Forests’ is more obscure. It has been supposed to be the Forest of Jedworth, but is undoubtedly identical with Selkirkshire, which even to the present day is know as Foresta or ’the Forest.’

He was one of the Scottish notables captured at Homildon Hill in 1402, and, though thus a prisoner of war, was barbarously put to death by Hotspur Percy to gratify a private grudge, and his mangled limbs were thereafter exposed on the gates of York and other English towns.

His virtues are summed up by the writer of the Scotichronicon in the noble epitaph, ‘Valens miles et inter sapientes primus.’

The name of Sir William Stewart’s wife had not been preserved, but after his death she married Walter de Bickerton, and survived till 1420 at least, in which year she drew her ’terce’ of Sir William’s hereditary pensions.

Sir William Stewart had at least two sons:

1. John, his successor.
2. _____, name unknown. He figures in his brother’s marriage-contract as Sir william’s ‘other son,’ to whom lands of the annual value of £20 were reserved out of their father’s estate.

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol IV, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 146-9.
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Notes for UNNAMED (Spouse 1)
The name of Sir William Stewart’s wife had not been preserved, but after his death she married Walter de Bickerton, and survived till 1420 at least, in which year she drew her ’terce’ of Sir William’s hereditary pensions.

Sir William Stewart had at least two sons:

1. John, his successor.
2. _____, name unknown. He figures in his brother’s marriage-contract as Sir william’s ‘other son,’ to whom lands of the annual value of £20 were reserved out of their father’s estate.

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol IV, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 146-9.
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