NameMary HANCE ®1, F
Birth Date7 Mar 1851
Birth PlaceGrafton, Lorain, Ohio, United States
Death Date17 Mar 1942
Death PlaceBrooklyn, Kings, New York, United States
Burial Date19 Mar 1942
Burial PlaceBrooklyn, Kings, New York, United States
OccupationMedical Doctor
ResidenceBrooklyn, Kings, New York
Cause of deathCauses Incident To Age
Spouses
Birth Date1 Jan 1848
Birth PlaceKilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland
Death Date9 Jun 1934
Death PlaceBrooklyn, Kings, New York, United States
Burial Date12 Jun 1934
Burial PlaceBrooklyn, Kings, New York, United States
OccupationPhysician, Chemist
ResidenceBrooklyn, Kings, New York
Education(See Notes)
Public Service(See Notes)
Cause of deathCauses Incident To Age
FatherDavid ECCLES , M (1820-1874)
MotherIsabella GIBSON , F (1814-1910)
Marr Date19 Sep 1873
Marr PlaceKansas City, Jackson, Missouri, United States
ChildrenDavid Charles , M (1876-1975)
Census notes for Mary HANCE
1900 US Census, New York
Kings County, City of New York
Brooklyn Borough
191 Dean Street

Eccles, Robert G, Head, born Jan 1848, age 52, mar 26y, born Scotland, parents born Scotland, immig 1860, Physician
Eccles, Mary H, Wife, born Mar 1851, age 49, mar 26y, 1 birth, 1 living, born Ohio, parents born New York, Physician
Eccles, David C, Son, born Dec 1877, age 22, single, born New York, Student
Eccles, Isabella, Mother, born Apr 1814, age 86, widow, born Scotland, parents born Scotland, immig 1860
McGee, Katie, Servant, born Mar 1877, age 23, single, born Ireland, parents born Ireland, immig 1895, Servant
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Obituary notes for Mary HANCE
Mary Hance Eccles, Brooklyn; woman’s medical College of the New York Infirmary for Women and Children, New York, 1878; aged 91; died, March 17, of arteriosclerosis, chronic myocarditis and coronary thrombosis.

Publication: Journal, A.M.A., May 9, 1842, “Deaths,”: p. 202
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Notes for Robert Gibson (Spouse 1)
ECCLES, Robert Gibson, physician and chemist, was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, Jan 1, 1848, son of David and Isabella (Gibson) Eccles. He came to America in 1862, and lived during his minority in many of the western states and territories. He was educated at public and private schools, and at the Long Island College Hospital, where he was graduated in 1882. In 1885 he experimentally showed that benzoic acid and the benzoates are excellent preservatives of food, dyrups and drugs, and boric acid was later investigated by him in the same direction. During 1889-96 he investigated the composition of calycanthus seeds and discovered the alkaloids calycanthine and glaucusine, likewise calycanthic acid. Prof. H.W. Wiley, of the department of agriculture followed him in the same study. He was the first in this country to investigate the inhibiting power of drugs on peptic digestion, and he devised the official test now used everywhere in this country for pepsin. In preparing the text for the alkaloids and active principles of the United States Pharmacopoeia he was the first to determine a large number of solubilities melting points and specific gravities the cound not be found in any work. He thus discovered that alkaloids as a rule have two fusing points, the one due to the water of crystalization and the other to the anhydrous chemical. He determined a large number of new color reactions for alkaloids, and first pointed out a possible gravimetric test for enzymes.

In 1890 Dr. Eccles was elected a member of the committee of revision of the United States Pharmacopoeia by delegates from the vrious medical and pharmaceutical colleges and societies of the various states and in this committee was chcairman of the sub-committee on active principles. He served as president of the chemical section of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences; vice president of the botanic section of the same institute; president of the New York Pharmaceutical Association; chairman of the department education of the American Pharmaceutical Associan; vice president of the Brooklyn Ethical Association; secretary of the Brooklyn Pathological society, and vice president of the pure food and drug congress. he was the first dean of the Brooklyn College of Pharmacy (1889-93), and in 1890 became professor or organic chemistry in that Insittution. He was chemist of the department of Indian affairs under Pres. Harrison, and was professor of chemistry in the New York School of Social Economics (1892-95). He was editor of “Popular Science” (1893-95), and of the “American Medico-Surgical Bullitin” (1895-99). Since 1890, the “Bulletin” having been merged into “Merck’s Archives of Materia Medica,” he has continued to edit the latter.

He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science; member of the American Chemical Society; of the Torrey botanical Clu; of the American Medical Association; of the American Anatomic Association; of the American Pharmaceutical Association; of the New York Pharmaceutical association; of the Medical society of the County of Kings, New York, and he is honorary member of the California College of Pharmacy; of the Greater New York Pharmaceutical Association; and of the New Jersey Pharmaceutical Association.

In 1877 he won the Elizabeth Thompson first prize, awarded by the American Social Science Association for the best paper on the labor question. He has been an extensive writer on scientivic and philosophical subjects. Some of his most important chemical papers have been “Study of Peptpnization;” “Melting Points of Alkaloids;” “Molecules and Atoms;” “Pepsin incompatibles;” “From Carbon to Alcohol;” “The discovery of Calycanthine;” “How Molecules are Measures;” “Evolution of Chemistry;” “The Benzene Theory;” “Analysis of Calycanthus Seed;” “Chemistry of Enzymes;” “Chemistry of Carbon Compounds;” “Composition of Scotch Oats Essence;” “A Study of Pepsin;” “How should Pepsin be Standardized,” and “ What is Pepsin?” He also contributed the articles on “Synthetic Remedies” and “Pepsin and Pancreating” to Wood’s “reference Handbooks of the Medical Sciences.”

Among the most important of his philosophical contributions are: “The Relativity of Knowledgs;” “The Study of Sociology;” “The Evolution of Mind;” “Descent and Disease;” “The Miracle of Health;” “Herbert Spencer’s Prosimate Definition of Life; “ “The Atmosphere and Life’ “ “Discipline and disease; “ “The Pons Asinorum of Therapeutica;” “The Principle of Continuity in Disease;” “Why Flowers are Beautiful,” and many others relating to his specialty of medical chemistry which were published in the various medical and scientific journals.

Dr Eccles is an extensive travler, and ther is scarcely a spot of scientific interest in North America where botonists, geologists or ethnologist find object of great interest which he has not explored. He has a large collection of botanic specimens which he has personally gathered from the Arctic ocean to the Mediterranean, from Russia to California, from Alaska to Mexico, from Canada to the gulf of Mexico.

On Sept. 19, 1873, he was married in Kansas City, Mo., to Mary H., daughter of Charles and Maria Hance. They have one son, David Charles Eccles, of the class of 1900, Columbia University.

Publication: The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. 10, pp. 238-39.
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Census notes for Robert Gibson (Spouse 1)
1900 US Census, New York
Kings County, City of New York
Brooklyn Borough
191 Dean Street

Eccles, Robert G, Head, born Jan 1848, age 52, mar 26y, born Scotland, parents born Scotland, immig 1860, Physician
Eccles, Mary H, Wife, born Mar 1851, age 49, mar 26y, 1 birth, 1 living, born Ohio, parents born New York, Physician
Eccles, David C, Son, born Dec 1877, age 22, single, born New York, Student
Eccles, Isabella, Mother, born Apr 1814, age 86, widow, born Scotland, parents born Scotland, immig 1860
McGee, Katie, Servant, born Mar 1877, age 23, single, born Ireland, parents born Ireland, immig 1895, Servant
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Immigration notes for Robert Gibson (Spouse 1)
Immigrated 1860.
Last Modified 12 Sep 2010Created 9 Jan 2017 using Reunion for Macintosh