NameEline Dorothea Strömbör BENTZEN ®1, F
Birth Date27 Dec 1810
Birth PlaceIndreby, Sokkelund, København, Danmark
Chr Date20 Feb 1811 ®55
Chr PlaceGarnisons, Sokkelund, København, Danmark
Chr MemoGarnison; Den Dansk Folkekirke
Death Date9 Mar 1877
Death PlaceSalt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
Burial Date12 Mar 1877 ®36
Burial PlaceSalt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
Burial MemoSalt Lake City Cemetery, Plat I, Block 17, Lot 11, -1/2-SO
OccupationMaidservant To A Lady, The Wife Of A Military Man, Before Marriage
ResidenceCopenhagen, Denmark --> Salt Lake City, Utah Territory
ReligionThe Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Cause of deathHemorrhage Of Lungs ®4
FlagsUtah Pioneer
FatherChristian BENDTZEN BORGREN , M (1787-1833)
Spouses
Birth Date8 Jul 1806 ®42
Birth PlaceLund, Lyderslev, Stevns, Præstø, Danmark
Chr Date10 Jul 1806 ®42
Chr PlaceLyderslev, Stevns, Præstø, Danmark
Death Date27 Feb 1876
Death PlaceSalt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Territory, United States
Burial DateMar 1876 ®36
Burial PlaceSalt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Territory, United States
Burial MemoSalt Lake City Cemetery, 7195 K single
OccupationSailor, Raft Navigator - “Pram Sticker Larsen.” Used Sailor Skills To Help Build Salt Lake Temple And Fillmore State House.
ResidenceCopenhagen, Denmark --> Salt Lake City, Utah Territory
Military ServiceEnlisted Seaman, Præstø; 23rd Lægd Præstø, No. 614.  L. N. 59; Copenhagen Artillery Regiment 1195/1836. Member Of The Salt Lake Silver Greys
Cause of deathDispepsy ®4
FlagsMilitary, Utah Pioneer
FatherLars PEDERSEN , M (1766-1833)
MotherMaren HANSDATTER Porse , F (1773-1839)
Marr Date5 Aug 1836
Marr PlaceKøbenhavn, Danmark
Marr MemoHolmen Kirke
ChildrenEllen Martine Pouline (Died as Infant), F (1837-1837)
 Eline Hansene , F (1838-1921)
 Carl Oluf (Died as Child), M (1840-1846)
 Lars Peter (Died as Infant), M (1843-1843)
 Christine Petrine , F (1844-1936)
 Marie Magdalene , F (1847-1931)
 Margrethe Kirstine (Died as Child), F (1849-1853)
 John George Erastus , M (1852-1922)
Notes for Eline Dorothea Strömbör BENTZEN
Garnisons Kirkebøg: Baptisms 1810 [Translation] Born 27 December 1810, Eline Dorothea Strömbör Bentzen, Baptized 30 Dec. Parents - Christian Bentzen in the Infantry Regiment o Copenhagen, and Pauline Falckenberg. Witnesses - Etastraad Wulf, Regiment Quartermaster Drewsen, Coppersmith Falckenberg, Madame A. K. Rönne, Jomfru Sophie Lorentsen.
--------------------------------

LDS Church Membership Record:

Name: Elena Dorothea Stromberg Bentzen
Gender: Female
Birth: 1810-12-27, Copenhagen, Copenhagn, Denmark
Death: 1877-03-09
Father: Christian Bensen
Spouse: Hans Larsen
LDS Bap: 15 Aug 1850
-------------------

Translated birth information:
(born) 27 December 1810
Eline Dorothea Strømbør Bentzen
(baptized) 30 Do.
(parents) Christian Bentzen in Infantry Regiment of Copenhagen, Pauline Falckenberg
(witnesses) Etatsraad Wulf, regiment quartermaster Drewsen, coppersmith Falckenberg, Madame A. K. Rønne, Jomfru Sophie Lorentsen

Original:
d. 27de Decb. 1810
Eline Dorothea Strømbør Bentzen
d. 30de Do.
Christian Bentzen ved Kjbhs Inf. Regt., Pauline Falckenberg
Etatsr. Wulf, Rgts Qvarterm. Drewsen, Kobbersmed Falckenberg, Md. A. K. Rønne, Jfr. Sophie Lorentsen
------------------

Den Danske Folkekirke. København Garnisons sogn
Contains church records from Garnisons parish in Copenhagen. The congregation was divided into a Danish and a German congregation, but in 1819 the German military personnel were placed under Frederikskirken, whereafter the church was used exclusively by the Danish garrison and the civilian congregation assigned there. In 1738 Frederikskirken was separated and in 1739 Citadels parish. In 1805 part of the disbanded Skt. Nikolaj parish was annexed to Garnisons parish. Part of the parish was annexed to Holmens parish in 1878 and part to Frederiks parish in 1894. Also known as Den Herre Zebaoths kirke.
---------------------------
Census notes for Eline Dorothea Strömbör BENTZEN
Kbhv, København (Staden),
Sankt Annæ Øster Kvarter, , ,
Norgesgade 183 A,Stueetagen, 1,
FT [Census]-1834
Name: Age: Marital status: Occupation in household: Occupation:
P. F.Wulff 55 Gift {Mar] Commandeur Capitain i Søe Etaten [Navy Commander Captain]
Commandeur af Dannebrog og Dannebrogsmand, [Commander of the Order of Dannebrog]
chef for Søe Cadet Corpset [Chief of Sea Cadet Corps
H.H.Wulff 45 Gift Commandeurinde [Commander’s wife]
C.N.Wulff 23 Ugift Løitnant i Søe Etaten [Navy Lieutenant], deres Søn [their son]
P.Wulff 25 Ugift Løitnant i Søe Etaten,deres Søn
H.H.Wulff 27 Ugift deres Datter [their daughter]
Niels Andersen 26 Ugift Tjenestefolk {Servant], Søe Indroleret [Navy conscript]
Pouline Dorthea 25 Ugift [Unmar] Tjenestefolk [Servant]
Dorthea Eriksen 39 Ugift Tjenestefolk
-------------------------

kbhv, København (Staden),
Christianshavn Kvarter,
Dronningensgade, , et Huus No 250, baghus 2.sal, 9,
FT [Census]-1840
Name: Age: Marital status: Occupation:
Hans Larsen 34 Gift [Married] Søemand [Seaman]
Eline Dorthea Strømbør 30 Gift hans Kone [his Wife]
Eline Hansine Larsen 2 Ugift deres Datter [their Daughter]
------------------------------

1845 Danish Census
kbhv, København (Staden), Christianshavn Kvarter,
Overgaden oven Vandet, , 1 sidesal, 178,
FT [Census] -1845

Hans Larsen, 39, Gift [Married], Sømand [Seaman], Born: Lund, Stevns, Præstø amt [county]
Eline Dorthea Bentzen, 35, Gift, Hans kone [His wife], Born: København
Eline Hansine Larsen, 7, Ugift [Unmarried], Deres børn [Their child], Born: Christianshavn
Carl Oluf Larsen, 5, Ugift, Deres børn, Born: Christianshavn
Stine Petrine Larsen, 1, Ugift, Deres børn, Born: Christianshavn

-----------------------------------
1850 Danish Census
kbhv, København (Staden), Christianshavn Kvarter,
Christianshavn kvarter II, Sankt Annæ Gade 270,
förste sal, 2031,
FT [Census] -1850

Hans Larsen, 43, Gift [Married], pramförer [barge pilot], Born: Lund Sogn, Præstøe Amt
Emilie Dorthea Bentzen, 39, Gift, hans kone [his wife], Born: Kjöbenhavn
Eline Hansine Larsen, 12, Ugift [Unmarried], deres börn [their child], Born: Ditto
Petrine Christine, 5, Ugift, , deres börn, Born: Ditto
Maria Magdalene, 3, Ugift, , deres börn, Born: Ditto
Margrete Christine, 1, Ugift, , deres börn, Born: Ditto

--------------------------

1860 United States Census
County of Gt. Salt Lake, Territory of Utah
Post Office: Great Salt Lake City
Page 129, 2nd Ward

Hans Larsen, age 53, farm laborer, born Denmark
Elina Larsen, age 50, born Denmark
Petrina Larsen, age 15, born Denmark
Mary Larsen, age 13, born Denmark
John Larsen, age 8, born Denmark
_________________

1870 US Census
2nd Ward, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Territory

Larson, Hans, age 64, Married, Laborer, born: Denmark
Larson, Ellen G., age 59, Married, Wife, born: Denmark
Larson, John, age 18, unmarried, Son, At Home, born: Denmark
Immigration notes for Eline Dorothea Strömbör BENTZEN
Source:"Mormon Immigration Index"
published by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints
© 2000 by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.

LARSEN, Hans, Gender: M Age: 46 Origin: Germany Occ: Laborer
Note: CRPC #88; Extracted from Original Passenger List
LARSEN, Elina, Gender: F Age: 42 Origin: Germany
Note: CRPC #88; Extracted from Original Passenger List
LARSEN, Elina, Gender: F Age: 13 Origin: Germany
Note: CRPC #88; Extracted from Original Passenger List
LARSEN, Christina, Gender: F Age: 8 Origin: Germany
Note: CRPC #88; Extracted from Original Passenger List
LARSEN, Maria, Gender: F Age: 5 Origin: Germany
Note: CRPC #88; Extracted from Original Passenger List


NOTE: Because the family had travelled from Denmark to Germany then to England, they were listed as originating in Germany instead of Denmark. There was also another child, John George Erastus, an infant.

Ship: Forest Monarch
Date of Departure: 16 Jan 1853
Port of Departure: Liverpool, England
LDS Immigrants: 297
Church Leader: John E. Forsgren
Date of Arrival: 16 Mar 1853
Port of Arrival: New Orleans, Louisiana
Source(s): Customs (FHL #200,173)
Notes: "DEPARTURES. . . . The Forest Monarch sailed on the 16th [OF] January, with 297 Danish Saints on board, under the presidency of Elder John Forsgren. . . ."


"SIXTIETH COMPANY. -- Forest Monarch, 297 souls. This company of emigrants was from the Scandinavian Mission, being the first large company of Saints who emigrated from Denmark, Sweden, and Norway. An earnest desire to emigrate to Zion had been manifested by many of the Scandinavian Saints since the first little company had left for the mountains a few months previous; and the elders had been busily engaged for some time past in making preparations to send off a large company.

About the beginning of December, 1852, the emigrants from the respective conferences in the mission began to gather in Copenhagen, Denmark, and on Monday, December 20th, 1852, two hundred and ninety-three Saints, including children, went on board the steamship Obotrit, and sailed from 'Toldboden' (the custom-house), at four o'clock p.m., under the leadership of Elder John E. Forsgren, one of the elders who, in connection with Apostle Erastus Snow, first introduced the gospel into Scandinavia two years before. A great multitude of people had gathered on the wharf to witness the departure of the 'Mormons,' and many of the rabble gave utterance to the most wicked and blasphemous language, while they cursed and swore, because so many of their countrymen were disgracing themselves by following 'that Swedish Mormon priest' (an appellation they gave Elder Forsgren) to America. No violence, however, was resorted to, and the ship got safely away.

After a rather stormy and unpleasant passage, the Obotrit arrived safely at Kiel, Holstein, on the evening of the twenty-second. The following day the journey was continued by rail to Hamburg, where a large hall had been hired, and supper prepared for the emigrants. In the afternoon of the twenty-fourth the Saints went on board the steamship Lion, which glided slowly with the tide down the river Elbe to Cuxhaven, where the captain cast anchor, owing to the heavy fog which prevailed. The emigrants now celebrated Christmas Eve on board, with songs and amusements of different kinds. In the morning of the twenty-fifth anchor was weighed, and the Lion sailed to the mouth of the river, where it was met by heavy headwinds, that made it impossible to reach the open sea until midnight. Finally, the passage from the river to the sea was made in the moonlight. Early in the morning of the twenty-sixth the ship passed Heligoland, soon after which a heavy gale blew up from the southwest, which increased in violence until the next day, when it assumed the character of a regular hurricane, the like of which old sailors declared they had never before experienced on the German Ocean. The ship's bridge and part of the gunwale were destroyed, and some goods standing on the deck were broken to pieces and washed overboard; otherwise, neither the ship nor the emigrants were injured. On the twenty-eighth, in the evening, after the storm had spent its fury, the Lion steamed into the harbor of Hull, England. About one hundred and fifty vessels were lost on the German Ocean in the storm, and the people in Hull were greatly surprised when the Lion arrived in safety, as it was firmly believed that she had gone under like the other ships that were lost.

From Hull, the emigrating Saints continued the journey by rail to Liverpool, on the 29th, where lodging and meals, previously ordered, were prepared for them, and on the first of January 1853, they went on board the packet ship Forest Monarch, which was hauled out of the dock and anchored in the river Mersey. There it lay until the 16th, because of storms and contrary winds. In the meantime three of the company died, two babies were born, and three fellow passengers were initiated into the Church by baptism. One man, who had been bitten by a dog was left in Liverpool, to be forwarded with the next company of emigrating Saints. One night the ship became entangled with another vessel and sustained some injuries; and a few days later, during a heavy storm, it got adrift, pulling up both anchors, and was just about to run aground, when two tug boats came to the rescue and saved it.

On the sixteenth of January, 1853, the Forest Monarch put out to sea. The emigrants now numbered two hundred and ninety-seven souls, who were placed under the direction of Elder John E. Forsgreen, in connection with whom Elders Christian Christiansen and J. H. Christiansen acted as counselors. Elders Willard Snow and Peter O. Hansen, who had accompanied the emigrating Saints to Liverpool, now returned to Copenhagen. During the voyage across the Atlantic Ocean the Forest Monarch was favored with very pleasant weather, but for several days it was a perfect calm, and in many respects the emigrants, who nearly all were unaccustomed to seafaring life, found the voyage trying and tedious. The provisions were poor, and their fresh water supply gave out before the journey was ended. Four deaths also occurred, and three children were born during the voyage.

On the eighth of March, 1853, the ship arrived safely at the mouth of the Mississippi River, where five of the company died, and on the arrival at New Orleans, on the sixteenth, two others departed this life, and one family who had apostatized remained in that city. From New Orleans the journey was continued by steamboat up the Mississippi River to St. Louis Missouri, where the emigrants landed on the thirty-first. In that city, tents and other commodities needed for the overland journey were purchased. After tarrying about a month, during which time six of the emigrants died and two couples were married, the company left St. Louis and proceeded by steamboat about two hundred miles further up the river to Keokuk, Iowa, where the emigrants pitched their tents for the first time, and lay in camp for several weeks before starting for the plains.

In the meantime the emigrants received their teams, consisting of oxen and wagons. Some of the Scandinavian emigrants, who at first rejected the American ways of driving oxen in yokes, went to work and manufactured harness in regular Danish fashion; but no sooner were these placed on the animals than they, frightened half to death, struck out in a wild run, refusing to be guided at all by the lines in the hands of their new masters from the far north. Crossing ditches and gulches in their frenzy, parts of the wagons were strewn by the way side; but the oxen, (many of which had never been hitched up before) were at last stopped by men who understood how to manipulate that most important article of all teamsters outfits--the whip; and the Danish emigrants, profiting by the experience they had gained, soon concluded that, although harness might do well enough for oxen in Denmark, the yoke and whip were preferable in America; and they readily accepted the method of their adopted country.

With thirty-four wagons and about one hundred and thirty oxen, the company rolled out from the camping ground near Keokuk on the twenty-first of May, and after three weeks rather difficult travel over prairies of Iowa, Council Bluffs, on the Missouri River, was reached. Here the company rested for several days, and on the twenty-seventh of June resumed the journey by crossing the Missouri River, after which they were soon far out on the plains. On the overland journey a number of the emigrants died, more children were born, and a few lost the faith in the midst of the hardships and trials of the long march. Finally on the thirtieth of September, 1853, the company arrived in Salt Lake City; and on the fourth of October the emigrants were nearly all rebaptized by Apostle Erastus Snow. They were counseled by President Brigham Young to settle in different parts of the Territory, and mix up with people of other nationalities, so as to become useful in developing the resources of the new country. Most of them located in Sanpete Valley, whither other companies from Scandinavia subsequently followed them, and that valley has ever since been known as the headquarters of the Scandinavians in Utah. Still President Young's advice has not been unheeded, as the people from the three countries of the north (Denmark, Sweden and Norway) are represented, to a greater or less extent, in nearly every town and settlement of the Saints in the Rocky Mountains.

(Millennial Star, Vol. XV, pp.89, 282, 368; Morgenstjernen, Vol. I, page 180.)"

"Sun. 16. [Jan. 1853] -- The ship Forest Monarch sailed from Liverpool, England, with 297 Scandinavian Saints, under John E. Forsgren's direction. The company arrived at New Orleans March 12th; at Keokuk, Iowa, in the beginning of April; and most of the emigrants reached G. [Great] S. [Salt] L. [Lake] City, Sept. 30th. This was the first large company of Saints who emigrated to Utah from Scandinavia."
Obituary notes for Eline Dorothea Strömbör BENTZEN
Newspaper: Deseret News, Salt Lake City, Utah Territory, 14 Mar 1877
Died: Salt Lake City, no date given, Eline Dorther [sic] Widow of Hans LARSEN and daughter of Christen and Pauline Christina BENSON, born Denmark, 27 Dec 1810.
----------------------------

DIED.

In the Second Ward of this city, of lung disease, ELINE DORTHER [sic] BENSEN LARSEN.

Deceased was born in Denmark, December 27th, 1810; was the daughter of Christen Bensen and Pouline Christina Bensen, and was the wife of the late Hans Larsen. She leaves a son and three daughters to mourn her loss. She died in full faith of the Gospel.--Com.

Scandinavian papers, please copy.

Newspaper, Deseret News, Salt Lake City, Utah Territory, 1877-03-14
------------------------------------
Notes for Hans (Spouse 1)
Lyderslev Kirkebøg: Baptisms 1806: [Translation] 10th of August (10th Sunday after Trinity) the blacksmith Lars Pedersen and wife Maren Hans Datter in Lund had a son to the baptism, who was called Hans; he was born 8th of July, baptized at home 10th. Witnesses: Tenant Hans Christensen’s wife, Catharine Jens Datter from Haunlev, and the farmers - Soren Hansen, Ole Nielsen, and Christopher Olsen from Lund. The mother held her church attendance same day.
----------------------------

LDS Church Membership Record:

Name: Hans Larsen
Gender: Male
Birth: 1806-07-08, Lund, Lyderslev, Praesto, Denmark
Death: 1876-02-27
Spouse: Eline Dorothea Stromber Bentzen
LDS Bap: 12 Aug 1850
--------------------

From Scandinavion Journal History
:
“Sunday 11 Aug [1850]: Elder Snow called these applicants for baptism together and gave them instructions prior to performing this divine and sacred, essential ordinance, “The doorway to Eternal Life!” which would be attended to the following day, Monday 12 Aug 1850.

Monday, 12 Aug 1850 is a memorable day in Church History in Danmark, when this day, the first converts of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, as taught by Him, through His divinely appointed servants were taken in the evening into the clear waters of Øresund, immediately outside the ramparts of København, and fifteen in number were immersed by Elder Erastus Snow as the first fruits of their divinely authorized labors and preaching of the Gospel of Christ in Danmark.”

Among these were Hans Larsen, and Eline Dorothea Stromberg Bentsen, his wife. At their house on Christians Havn, a meeting was held Sunday, 18 Aug 1850. Where the newly baptized members were confirmed and three little daughters of Hans and Eline Larsen were blessed by divine authority according to the pattern given by the Savior of the world eighteen hundred years ago. These were Petrine Christine, ... Marie Magdelene, standing left, and Margaret Christine (buried at New Orleans), who were the first children so blessed in this dispensation in Danmark.

Sunday 29 Dec 1850: Hans Larsen was ordained a Deacon.

June 22 1851: A meeting was held in København. Hans Larsen volunteered a mission to Bornholm, Danmark.”


Emigrated from Denmark January 1853. Left Liverpool, England, 16 Jan 1853, aboard the”Forest Monarch” as part of a company of 297 Danish Saints under the presidency of Elder John Forsgren. Arrived at New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, 16 Mar 1853 and in Salt Lake City in September. Family group included father, Hans (age 46), mother, Eline (age 42), and children Eline (age 13), Christina (age 8), Marget (age 3), and John George Erastus (age 4 mos.). Marget died at sea the day before arriving at New Orleans and was buried at New Orleans.
--------------------------------

In her personal history, daughter Elena Hansena writes: I [Elena Hansena Larsen] first heard the Gospel of Jesus Christ of the Latterday Saints preached in my father’s home in Copenhagen, Denmark by the first two missionaries (Erastus Snow and George P. Dykes) to enter in Denmark. The very first meetings, the first Sacrament, was [administered] in my father’s [Hans Larsen] home. My parents were two of the first fifteen that were baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints in Denmark, 12 Aug 1850, by Erastus Snow. I was the first girl to be baptized, 6 Sep 1850, by George P. Dykes...We emigrated to Utah with the first regular company of Latterday Saints that left Denmark, 20 Dec 1852...We arrived in Salt Lake City, Utah, 30 Sep 1853, after a long tiresome journey.”
---------------------------------------

From: Pioneers and Prominent Men in Utah, Esshom, p 998

LARSON, HANS, (son of Lars Petersen, born 1766, died Nov 26, 1833, and Maren Hansen, born 1770, died March 20, 1839, of Lunde Lyderslaw, praesto amt., denmark). He was born July8, 1806, at Lunce. Came to Utah Sept. 30, 1853, John Forsgren company.

Married Elena Dorothea Bensen Aug 5, 1836, at Copenhagen, Denmark (daughter of Christian Bensen and Pauline Kirstine Margrette Falkenberg), who was born Dec 27, 1810, died March 4 1877. Their children: Ellen Matine Paulene b. 1837, d 1837; Elena Hansine b. Sep 13, 1838, m John Lambert; Carl Olof b. 1840, d 1846; Peter b. 1843, d 1843; Petrine christine b. Aug 13, 1844, m. samuel Miller; Mary Magdalene b. March 11, 1847, m John F. Oblade; Margrete Jkerstine b. 1849, d 1853; John George Erastus b sep 3, 1852, m Mary Cecilia Smith. Family Home in Salt Lake City.

High priest. worked on Salt Lake temple many years. Sailor. Died Feb 27, 1876, at Salt Lake City.
----------------------------------------

The Hans Larsen family lived in the Second Ward of Salt Lake City, on 8th South and 3rd East.

From: Encyclopedic History of the LDS Church:
SALT LAKE CITY 2ND WARD, Liberty Stake, one of the original nineteen wards of Salt Lake City, organized Feb. 22, 1849, [in 1930] consists of Latter-day Saints residing in that part of Salt Lake City which is bounded on the north by 6th South St ..., east by 6th East St. ..., south by 9th South St.... , and west by 3rd East St. ... These boundaries are the same as when the ward was organized; later the southern boundary was extended as settlers took up land south of 9th South St., but the organization of Liberty Ward in 1907 reduced the 2nd Ward to its former limits.

At the time of its organization, John Lowry was set apart as Bishop. He with Jmes Leach and Horace Drake, soon afterwards made a ditch from the mouth of Emigration Canyon to convey water to the settlers of the ward.

The first Scandinavian saints who arrived in Utah in 1852 located in the 2nd Ward and the first Scandinavian meeting in Utah were also held in this ward.

An adobe school house was erected on 7th South St. between 4th and 5th East streets in 1852. This was replaced by a brick building in 1883, which, after the erection of a fine ward chapel on the corner of 7th South and 5th East Streets, was used as a knitting factory.

From the time of its organization the 2nd Ward belonged to the Salt Lake Stake of Zion, but when Liberty Stake was organized in 1904, it became part of that stake...
-------------------------

“Highlights of the Church in Scandinavia,” Ensign, July 1974, p.48

1726: The “Konventikel Edict” in Sweden forbids all religious gatherings except those of the Protestant Lutheran State Church.

1809: The Swedish Constitution grants freedom to organize dissenter sects if they are recognized and approved by the government.

1843: Several Danes join the Church in Boston.

1849: The Danish Constitution, Signed by King Frederik VII, guarantees religious freedom. Elders Erastus Snow (Council of the Twelve) and Peter O. Hansen are called to open the Scandinavian Mission in Denmark. John Erik Forsgren volunteers to accompany them and preach in his native Sweden. He is arrested several times and finally deported.

1850-59: 9,854 people are baptized in Scandinavian Mission; about 25 percent (2,357) emigrate to Utah.

1850: Fifteen men and women, including two Swedes, are baptized in Denmark in August. In September, the first branch is organized with 50 members.

1851: In Denmark, the Bornholm Branch is organized, the Copenhagen Branch is divided. The Book of Mormon is translated into Danish, first translation of modern scriptures into a non-English tongue. On New Year’s Day, Christian Christensen becomes the first to receive the Melchizedek Priesthood in the mission. First issue of the LDS periodical Skandinaviens Stjerne is published. In September, Elder Hans F. Petersen embarks for Norway with a Norwegian sea captain, Svend Larsen, whom he baptized in Denmark—first Norwegian baptized in Europe. First baptisms in Norway are performed in November.

1852: Two American elders reach Norway, baptize six persons in June, organize the Oesterrisoer Branch with 18 members, first branch in Norway, in July. The next week they organize the Fredrikstad Branch. Some missionaries are arrested and imprisoned for several months. Scandinavians begin to join the Church in considerable numbers.

1852: First Mormon emigrants leave Denmark and Sweden.
------------------------

“Military districts were organized, one in each county [of Utah]. At the first there were not sufficient men in each district for a company or battalion. As the number increased, a brigade was formed, with a brigadier-general in command, and afterward a division, in charge of a major-general. Each district made returns direct to the adjutant-general’s office. [Wells Narr., NS,m 10.] “

“... The first regiment consisted entirely of cavalry, and the first company, first battalion -- termed lifeguards--of selected men, whose duty it was to protect Salt Lake City and its vicinity from Indian depredations... Jesse P. Harmon captain of the first company, first battalion, called the Silver Grays, and composed of men over 50 years of age... Hist. B. Young, MS., 79”

Hans Larsen was a member of the Silver Grays
------------------------
Census notes for Hans (Spouse 1)
Praestoe, Stevns, Lyderslev, Lund By
FT [Census] 1834

Jens Larsen [Hans’ brother], age 29, Gift [Married], Husmand og Smed
Ole Hansen, age 13, Ugift [Unmarried], hans Stedsøn [his Stepson]
Anne Sophie Jensdatter, age 1, Ugift, hans datter [his daughter]
Maren Hansdatter [mother of Jens Larsen], age 62, Enke [Widow], Inderste og Aftægtskone [Lodger and Pensioner]
Hans Larsen, age 28, Ugift [Unmarried], hendes barn [her son], Matros [Sailor}
Anders Larsen, age 24, Ugift, hendes barn, Matros
Jacob Larsen, age 22, Ugift, hendes barn, Matros
----------------------------

kbhv, København (Staden),
Christianshavn Kvarter,
Dronningensgade, , et Huus No 250, baghus 2.sal, 9,
FT [Census]-1840

Hans Larsen 34 Gift [Married] Søemand [Seaman]
Eline Dorthea Strømbør 30 Gift hans Kone [his Wife]
Eline Hansine Larsen 2 Ugift deres Datter [their Daughter]
------------------------------

1845 Danish Census
kbhv, København (Staden), Christianshavn Kvarter,
Overgaden oven Vandet, , 1 sidesal, 178,
FT [Census] -1845

Hans Larsen, 39, Gift [Married], Sømand [Seaman], Born: Lund, Stevns, Præstø amt [county]
Eline Dorthea Bentzen, 35, Gift, Hans kone [His wife], Born: København
Eline Hansine Larsen, 7, Ugift [Unmarried], Deres børn [Their child], Born: Christianshavn
Carl Oluf Larsen, 5, Ugift, Deres børn, Born: Christianshavn
Stine Petrine Larsen, 1, Ugift, Deres børn, Born: Christianshavn
-----------------------------------

1850 Danish Census
kbhv, København (Staden), Christianshavn Kvarter,
Christianshavn kvarter II, Sankt Annæ Gade 270,
förste sal, 2031,
FT [Census] -1850

Hans Larsen, 43, Gift [Married], pramförer [barge pilot], Born: Lund Sogn, Præstøe Amt
Emilie Dorthea Bentzen, 39, Gift, hans kone [his wife], Born: Kjöbenhavn
Eline Hansine Larsen, 12, Ugift [Unmarried], deres börn [their child], Born: Ditto
Petrine Christine, 5, Ugift, , deres börn, Born: Ditto
Maria Magdalene, 3, Ugift, , deres börn, Born: Ditto
Margrete Christine, 1, Ugift, , deres börn, Born: Ditto
--------------------------

1860 United States Census
County of Gt. Salt Lake, Territory of Utah
Post Office: Great Salt Lake City
Page 129, 2nd Ward

Hans Larsen, age 53, farm laborer, born Denmark
Elina Larsen, age 50, born Denmark
Petrina Larsen, age 15, born Denmark
Mary Larsen, age 13, born Denmark
John Larsen, age 8, born Denmark
_________________

1870 US Census
2nd Ward, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Territory

Larson, Hans, age 64, Married, Laborer, born: Denmark
Larson, Ellen G., age 59, Married, Wife, born: Denmark
Larson, John, age 18, unmarried, Son, At Home, born: Denmark
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Immigration notes for Hans (Spouse 1)
Source:"Mormon Immigration Index"
published by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints
© 2000 by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.

LARSEN, Hans, Gender: M Age: 46 Origin: Germany Occ: Laborer
Note: CRPC #88; Extracted from Original Passenger List
LARSEN, Elina, Gender: F Age: 42 Origin: Germany
Note: CRPC #88; Extracted from Original Passenger List
LARSEN, Elina, Gender: F Age: 13 Origin: Germany
Note: CRPC #88; Extracted from Original Passenger List
LARSEN, Christina, Gender: F Age: 8 Origin: Germany
Note: CRPC #88; Extracted from Original Passenger List
LARSEN, Maria, Gender: F Age: 5 Origin: Germany
Note: CRPC #88; Extracted from Original Passenger List


NOTE: Because the family had travelled from Denmark to Germany then to England, they were listed as originating in Germany instead of Denmark. There was also another child, John George Erastus, an infant.

Ship: Forest Monarch
Date of Departure: 16 Jan 1853
Port of Departure: Liverpool, England
LDS Immigrants: 297
Church Leader: John E. Forsgren
Date of Arrival: 16 Mar 1853
Port of Arrival: New Orleans, Louisiana
Source(s): Customs (FHL #200,173)
Notes: "DEPARTURES. . . . The Forest Monarch sailed on the 16th [OF] January, with 297 Danish Saints on board, under the presidency of Elder John Forsgren. . . ."


"SIXTIETH COMPANY. -- Forest Monarch, 297 souls. This company of emigrants was from the Scandinavian Mission, being the first large company of Saints who emigrated from Denmark, Sweden, and Norway. An earnest desire to emigrate to Zion had been manifested by many of the Scandinavian Saints since the first little company had left for the mountains a few months previous; and the elders had been busily engaged for some time past in making preparations to send off a large company.

About the beginning of December, 1852, the emigrants from the respective conferences in the mission began to gather in Copenhagen, Denmark, and on Monday, December 20th, 1852, two hundred and ninety-three Saints, including children, went on board the steamship Obotrit, and sailed from 'Toldboden' (the custom-house), at four o'clock p.m., under the leadership of Elder John E. Forsgren, one of the elders who, in connection with Apostle Erastus Snow, first introduced the gospel into Scandinavia two years before. A great multitude of people had gathered on the wharf to witness the departure of the 'Mormons,' and many of the rabble gave utterance to the most wicked and blasphemous language, while they cursed and swore, because so many of their countrymen were disgracing themselves by following 'that Swedish Mormon priest' (an appellation they gave Elder Forsgren) to America. No violence, however, was resorted to, and the ship got safely away.

After a rather stormy and unpleasant passage, the Obotrit arrived safely at Kiel, Holstein, on the evening of the twenty-second. The following day the journey was continued by rail to Hamburg, where a large hall had been hired, and supper prepared for the emigrants. In the afternoon of the twenty-fourth the Saints went on board the steamship Lion, which glided slowly with the tide down the river Elbe to Cuxhaven, where the captain cast anchor, owing to the heavy fog which prevailed. The emigrants now celebrated Christmas Eve on board, with songs and amusements of different kinds. In the morning of the twenty-fifth anchor was weighed, and the Lion sailed to the mouth of the river, where it was met by heavy headwinds, that made it impossible to reach the open sea until midnight. Finally, the passage from the river to the sea was made in the moonlight. Early in the morning of the twenty-sixth the ship passed Heligoland, soon after which a heavy gale blew up from the southwest, which increased in violence until the next day, when it assumed the character of a regular hurricane, the like of which old sailors declared they had never before experienced on the German Ocean. The ship's bridge and part of the gunwale were destroyed, and some goods standing on the deck were broken to pieces and washed overboard; otherwise, neither the ship nor the emigrants were injured. On the twenty-eighth, in the evening, after the storm had spent its fury, the Lion steamed into the harbor of Hull, England. About one hundred and fifty vessels were lost on the German Ocean in the storm, and the people in Hull were greatly surprised when the Lion arrived in safety, as it was firmly believed that she had gone under like the other ships that were lost.

From Hull, the emigrating Saints continued the journey by rail to Liverpool, on the 29th, where lodging and meals, previously ordered, were prepared for them, and on the first of January 1853, they went on board the packet ship Forest Monarch, which was hauled out of the dock and anchored in the river Mersey. There it lay until the 16th, because of storms and contrary winds. In the meantime three of the company died, two babies were born, and three fellow passengers were initiated into the Church by baptism. One man, who had been bitten by a dog was left in Liverpool, to be forwarded with the next company of emigrating Saints. One night the ship became entangled with another vessel and sustained some injuries; and a few days later, during a heavy storm, it got adrift, pulling up both anchors, and was just about to run aground, when two tug boats came to the rescue and saved it.

On the sixteenth of January, 1853, the Forest Monarch put out to sea. The emigrants now numbered two hundred and ninety-seven souls, who were placed under the direction of Elder John E. Forsgreen, in connection with whom Elders Christian Christiansen and J. H. Christiansen acted as counselors. Elders Willard Snow and Peter O. Hansen, who had accompanied the emigrating Saints to Liverpool, now returned to Copenhagen. During the voyage across the Atlantic Ocean the Forest Monarch was favored with very pleasant weather, but for several days it was a perfect calm, and in many respects the emigrants, who nearly all were unaccustomed to seafaring life, found the voyage trying and tedious. The provisions were poor, and their fresh water supply gave out before the journey was ended. Four deaths also occurred, and three children were born during the voyage.

On the eighth of March, 1853, the ship arrived safely at the mouth of the Mississippi River, where five of the company died, and on the arrival at New Orleans, on the sixteenth, two others departed this life, and one family who had apostatized remained in that city. From New Orleans the journey was continued by steamboat up the Mississippi River to St. Louis Missouri, where the emigrants landed on the thirty-first. In that city, tents and other commodities needed for the overland journey were purchased. After tarrying about a month, during which time six of the emigrants died and two couples were married, the company left St. Louis and proceeded by steamboat about two hundred miles further up the river to Keokuk, Iowa, where the emigrants pitched their tents for the first time, and lay in camp for several weeks before starting for the plains.

In the meantime the emigrants received their teams, consisting of oxen and wagons. Some of the Scandinavian emigrants, who at first rejected the American ways of driving oxen in yokes, went to work and manufactured harness in regular Danish fashion; but no sooner were these placed on the animals than they, frightened half to death, struck out in a wild run, refusing to be guided at all by the lines in the hands of their new masters from the far north. Crossing ditches and gulches in their frenzy, parts of the wagons were strewn by the way side; but the oxen, (many of which had never been hitched up before) were at last stopped by men who understood how to manipulate that most important article of all teamsters outfits--the whip; and the Danish emigrants, profiting by the experience they had gained, soon concluded that, although harness might do well enough for oxen in Denmark, the yoke and whip were preferable in America; and they readily accepted the method of their adopted country.

With thirty-four wagons and about one hundred and thirty oxen, the company rolled out from the camping ground near Keokuk on the twenty-first of May, and after three weeks rather difficult travel over prairies of Iowa, Council Bluffs, on the Missouri River, was reached. Here the company rested for several days, and on the twenty-seventh of June resumed the journey by crossing the Missouri River, after which they were soon far out on the plains. On the overland journey a number of the emigrants died, more children were born, and a few lost the faith in the midst of the hardships and trials of the long march. Finally on the thirtieth of September, 1853, the company arrived in Salt Lake City; and on the fourth of October the emigrants were nearly all rebaptized by Apostle Erastus Snow. They were counseled by President Brigham Young to settle in different parts of the Territory, and mix up with people of other nationalities, so as to become useful in developing the resources of the new country. Most of them located in Sanpete Valley, whither other companies from Scandinavia subsequently followed them, and that valley has ever since been known as the headquarters of the Scandinavians in Utah. Still President Young's advice has not been unheeded, as the people from the three countries of the north (Denmark, Sweden and Norway) are represented, to a greater or less extent, in nearly every town and settlement of the Saints in the Rocky Mountains.

(Millennial Star, Vol. XV, pp.89, 282, 368; Morgenstjernen, Vol. I, page 180.)"

"Sun. 16. [Jan. 1853] -- The ship Forest Monarch sailed from Liverpool, England, with 297 Scandinavian Saints, under John E. Forsgren's direction. The company arrived at New Orleans March 12th; at Keokuk, Iowa, in the beginning of April; and most of the emigrants reached G. [Great] S. [Salt] L. [Lake] City, Sept. 30th. This was the first large company of Saints who emigrated to Utah from Scandinavia."
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Forest Monarch
Ship: 977 tons: 149' x 31' x 23'
Built: 1851 by Pierre Valin at Quebec, Canada
Mormon emigrants from Denmark, Sweden, and Norway-the first large Scandinavian company-assembled at Liverpool and on New Year's Day 1853 boarded the Canadian-built packet ship Forest Monarch . However, storms and contrary winds kept the vessel anchored in the River Mersey for more than two weeks. During that time three children died, two babies were born, three passengers were converted and baptized, and some emigrants were injured when a nearby craft broke loose from her moorings and drifted into the Forest Monarch. Finally on 16 January 1853 the Scandinavians sailed out of the estuary and were on their way to America. There were now 297 Saints among the passengers. Elder John E. Forsgren presided over the company. Two years earlier he had opened the Scandinavian Mission with Apostle Erastus Snow. Forsgren's shipboard counselors were Elders Christian Christiansen and J. H. Christensen. During the voyage the weather was generally pleasant, although the ship was becalmed for several days. Provisions were poor, and fresh water was exhausted before reaching port. Four deaths were recorded, and three children were born during the crossing. After a fifty-nine day passage the ship arrived at New Orleans on 16 March, but several days earlier at the mouth of the Mississippi five more emigrants died.
This British square-rigger was skippered by Captain Edmund Brewer and hailed out of Liverpool. The Forest Monarch was carver-built with three masts, one deck, a round stern, a standing bowsprit, and a figurehead of a man. Her owners had been Pierre Valin of Quebec, her builder, and De Novo at Liverpool. The vessel was not listed in Lloyd's Register after 1854.

Source:Ships, Saints, and Mariners by Conway B. Sonne and other sources.
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Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel

John E. Forsgren Company (1853)
 
Departure: 21 May 1853
Arrival: 29-30 September 1853

Company Information:
294 individuals and 34 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Keokuk, Iowa.

Larsen, Hans (46)
Larsen
, Elena Dorthea Stromberg Bentz (42)
Larsen, Elena Hansena (14)
Larsen, Petrine Christine (8)
Larsen, Mary Magdalena (6)
Larsen, John George Erastus (infant)

Source of Trail Excerpt:
Lambert, Elena Hansena Larsen, Reminiscence in Arthur Smith Larsen, Biographical sketh of Hans and Dorthea Larsen and family 1950.

Read Trail Excerpt:
After leaving Keokuk we had some accidents on the way.
A few got run over; one was brother William Andersen, but none proved fatal. We had an exciting time one day when being ferried over a river. One wagon had hitched to it two yoke of oxen which ran clear off the raft into the river and the wagon bed floated off with one woman in it. This was a short distance from a big water fall over a dam, however all was rescued safely but wet and the oxen swam out with the running-gears.
We camped one night and next day outside of a settlement when some men came and told us to get or they would serve us as they did the Mormons. Our president—the name I have forgotten—was away from us, in <had gone to > town, and The storm clouds had been gathering all day, and we hastened to get upon some highlands before us before night. Our ten wagons were first there at near darkness and had just pitched our tents when the storm broke bringing dreadful flashes of lightening and thunder. Father had to be out herding the cattle and could only see them when it lightinged. There was not much supper that night!
On our way we had Indian visitors who at times would ride up in front of the head team <stop it> & cause the entire train to stop and they would beg for everything. One time they wanted to buy mother and give horsed for her.
We arrived in Salt Lake the 30 of September 1853 after a long and tiresome journey.
Obituary notes for Hans (Spouse 1)
Newspaper: Deseret News, Salt Lake City, Utah, 8 Mar 1876
Died: Salt Lake City, 27 Feb 1876, Hans LARSEN, born Lund, Lydrslov, Sjaland, Denmark, 8 Jul 1806.
DIED. In the Second Ward of this city, February 27th, HANS LARSEN, after an illness of nearly six weeks.
Deceased was born July 1, 1806, at Lund, Lyderslov, Sjaland, Denmark; was one of the first fifteen baptized by Elder Erastus Snow in Copenhagen, August 12, 1850; emigrated to this city in Elder Forsgren’s company in 1853; lived in this city ever since; was a member of the High Priests’ Quorum; was a faithful Latter-day Saint, loved and respected by all who know him; died in hope of a glorious resurrection.
Scandinavian Star, please copy.
Notes for Hans & Eline Dorothea Strömbör (Family)
Holmens Kirkebøg: Marriages:

Hans Larsen
30 Aar.
Indrull. Matr. Præstøe A.
23 Lægd P. A. No. 614. L. N. 59
Kbh. A.R. 1195/1836
Ungkarl.
Gl. Strand No. 7
Vacc. 1811 af Roos, Læge i Vemmetofte.
Indskr. d. 15d

Eline Dorthea Strømberg Bentzen
25½ Aar
Pige
Dybensgade No. 181
Vacc. 1811 af Stebuss.

Martin Suhr
Vertshusholder
Gl. Strand No. 7
Rasmus Pedersen
Høker
Store Kongensgade No. 68

d. 5te August 1836

I Kirken af Hr. Riis

Julii

Translation courtesy of Arne Nielsen, Denmark:

Groom:
Hans Larsen
30 years old.
Enlisted seaman, Præstø county
23rd Lægd Præstø county No. 614.  L. N. 59
Copenhagen Artillery Regiment 1195/1836
Bachelor
Gl. Strand No. 7
Vaccinated 1811 by Roos, doctor in Vemmetofte.
Entered on the 15th

Bride:
Eline Dorthea Strømberg Bentzen
25½ years old
Maid
Dybensgade No. 181
Vacc. 1811 by Stebuss.

Witnesses:
Martin Suhr
Publican
Gammel Strand No. 7
Rasmus Pedersen
Chandler
Store Kongensgade No. 68

Date: 5 August 1836, In the church by Mr. Riis

July

(Lægd = recruiting area, L. N. = løbenummer = serial number)
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Last Modified 17 Jul 2014Created 9 Jan 2017 using Reunion for Macintosh