NameAnn Maria LAMBERT ®1, F
Birth Date24 May 1861
Birth PlaceSugarhouse, Salt Lake, Utah Territory, United States
Death Date31 Dec 1948 ®4
Death PlaceHeber City, Wasatch, Utah, United States
Death Memo137 East 2nd South
Burial Date4 Jan 1949
Burial PlaceHeber City, Wasatch, Utah, United States
Burial MemoHeber City Cemetery
ResidenceWoodland, Summit, Utah --> Tabiona, Duchesne, Utah
ReligionThe Church Of Jesus Christ Of Latter-Day Saints
Cause of deathHypostatic Pneumonia, Chronic Myocarditis ®4
FlagsUtah Pioneer
FatherJohn LAMBERT , M (1820-1893)
MotherAdelia GROESBECK , F (1822-1910)
Spouses
Birth Date1 Jan 1858
Birth PlaceBoston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States
Death Date12 Dec 1944
Death PlaceSusanville, Lassen, California, United States
Burial Date18 Dec 1944
Burial PlaceMarion, Summit, Utah, United States
OccupationFarmer, Lumberman
ResidenceWoodland, Summit, Utah -->Tabiona, Duchesne, Utah
Alias/AKADolph White
FlagsUtah Pioneer
FatherThomas Philip WHITE , M (1837-1916)
MotherAlice POTTS , F (1837-1921)
Marr Date15 Mar 1883
Marr PlaceSalt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
ChildrenAnnie Mae , F (1884-1975)
 Maggie Laverna , F (1886-1971)
 Franklin Adophus , M (1889-1955)
 Minerva Alice , F (1891-1975)
 James Clawson , M (1897-1984)
 Pearl , F (1899-1989)
 Talmage Lambert , M (1901-1995)
 Vesta Lambert , F (1903-1961)
 Bryan Lambert , M (1905-1974)
Notes for Ann Maria LAMBERT
LDS Church Membership Record:
Name: Ann Maria Lambert
Gender: Female
Birth: 1861-05-24, Sugar House, Salt Lake, Utah
Death: 1948-12-31
Father: John Lambert
Mother: Adelia Groesbeck
Spouse: Thomas Adolphus White
LDS Bap: Jun 1871
--------------------

From: “Footprints in a Beautiful Valley: a History of Tabiona-Hanna,” Springville, UT, Art City Publishing Company, [1980?], p 596 - 597:

HISTORY OF THOMAS ADOLPHUS WHITE and ANN MARIE LAMBERT WHITE

Thomas and Ann Marie were married March 15, 1883, in the endowment house in Salt Lake City, Utah

Thomas and Ann had a lovely home in Woodland, Utah, in a beautiful setting of meadow and streams with mountains behind the farm. But when the Uintah [Indian] reservation was opened to homesteading in 1905, he [Thomas] filed on land in Tabiona Valley, and was the first to file on water rights there. Each homestead was “drawn” and when the first settlers arrived they had to find the parcel of land they had drawn. The first men to come into the valley of Tabiona to homestead were: Thomas A. White, Arthur W. Maxwell, Ethelbert White, Alma W. Wagstaff, Ollie Hand and Nephi Chatwin.

At first they lived in a cellar they dug out of a hill. Later they built a one-room log house and later they added on to it. After the ground was cleared and the crops were planted, Thomas would go back to Woodland and see his family and look after his affairs there, leaving his oldest son, Franklin, to look after the stock and take care of things until he returned. Franklin was only about seventeen at the time and he stated that it was very lonely there the first winter. The sounds of the cattle and the coyotes were his only company.

At this time there were Indians, but they were mostly to be dreaded and avoided, if possible, as they were very bitter about this land being opened to homesteading. There was a fort in the middle of the valley and soldiers were there for some time to control the Indians. Thomas White later became an Indian agent of the Uintah Basin.

Thomas and Ann were big people. Thomas was very strong. He had driven an ox team consisting of 18 or 20 oxen pulling a number of wagons from Salt Lake City to Eureka, Nevada, hauling freight when the gold-mining boom was on about 1876. He was also a timber man. He loved being up in the mountains. He could cut a tree down faster than any other man. He could cut a large tree down with three chops.

Thomas always believed in “early to bed and early to rise,” and he said bread and milk was the best food on earth.

After Ann had her first child, she was never very well and had to do most of her work sitting down. She taught her children how to cook, and to become excellent housekeepers. They raised a large garden and made their own horseradish and sauerkraut. They dried most of their vegetables at this time and bottled their fruit. Ann would card their own wool and make their clothes and bedding.

Thomas and Ann were very religious. Thomas went and cut down some logs to build him a home, but instead thought they needed a meeting house more than he needed a house. So he donated the logs to build the first church house in Tabiona. A small branch was organized when the first settlers brought their families there to live. It was called Theodora Ward. Thomas A. White was appointed presiding elder. Meetings were held at different homes until about 1910, when the first meeting house was completed. It also served as the first school house. Thomas White was also instrumental in the settlement and development of Fruitland and Redcliff Wards. In 1910 at a special meeting held at Tabiona on the 24th of July, a branch of the Church was organized with Thomas A. White as a presiding elder from 1910 to 1911.

The following is a part of a talk given June 15, 1913. Brother White spoke for a few minutes, stating that he was thankful for what he had learned, and for what he had been able to do. “We can learn a little almost all our lives and at almost all times. It is our duty to do good to all and by so doing, we will be greatly benefited. We must become pliable to all whose duty it is to rule over us.”

Thomas White crossed the plains in 1860, at the age of two years. Thomas and Ann were the parents of nine children: Franklin, Annie May, Maggie, Talmage, James, Minerva, Vesta, Bryan, and Pearl. Thomas and Ann celebrated their 61st Wedding Anniversary with all their children living.

Thomas Adolphus White was born January 1, 1858, at Boston, Mass. He died Dec. 12, 1944 at the age of 87 years. Ann Marie White was born May 24, 1861, at Sugar House, [Salt Lake], Utah. She died at the age of 87 years.
-----------------------------
Census notes for Ann Maria LAMBERT
1910 United States Census
State of Utah, County of Wasatch
Stockmore Precinct

White, Thomas A, Head, age 52, mar, born Massachusetts, Farmer
White, Annie, Wife, age 48, mar, born Utah
White, Frank A., Son, age 21, Single, born Utah, Odd Jobs
White, James, Son, age 12, born Utah
White, Pearl, Daughter, age 11, born Utah
White, Talmage, Son, age 8, born Utah
White, Besta, Daughter, age 6, born Utah
White, Bryan, Son, age 4, born Utah
---------------------
1920 United States Census
State of Utah, County of Duchesne
Tabiona

White, Thos. A., Head, age 61, mar, born Massachusetts, Farming
White, Ann M., Wife, age 58, mar, born Utah
White, Vesta, Daughter, age 16, single, born Utah
White, Talmage, Son, age 18, single, born Utah
White, Pearl, Daughter, age 21, single, born Utah
White, Bryan, son, age 14, born Utah
-------------------------

1930 United States Census
State of Utah, County of Duchesne
Oakley

White, Thomas A, Head, age 72, mar, born Massachusetts, parents born England, General Farmer
White, Ann M, Wife, age 68, mar, born Utah, father born England, mother born Ohio
--------------------------
Notes for Thomas Adolphus (Spouse 1)
LDS Church Membership Record:
Name: Thomas Adolphus White
Gender: Male
Birth: 1858-01-01, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts
Death: 1944-12-12
Father: Thomas Phillip White
Mother: Alice Potts
Spouse: Ann Maria Lambert
LDS Bap: 27 May 1866
-----------------

From: “Footprints in a Beautiful Valley: a History of Tabiona-Hanna,” Springville, UT, Art City Publishing Company, [1980?], p 594 - 597:

THOMAS and ANN LAMBERT WHITE,
by Talmage L. White, a son

My earliest recollection of Tabiona came in 1907 when my father, Thomas Adolphus White, his wife, Ann Lambert White, and our family moved east from Woodland, Summit County, Utah, over Wolf Creek Summit to the Uintah Reservation. We drove by wagon up to Wilckens’ camp, on the South Fork of the Provo River, where we ... [missing words?] ...exchanged back to wagons again at Germany’s ranch on the west side of the Duchesne River. Minerva, my older sister, got her face burned bad from the bright sun on the miles of snow over the summit.

The previous year my father and Frank, my older brother, had been over and located our 160 acres of land. They built a small one-room house from one inch lumber hauled from Uncle Dan Lambert’s sawmill in the head of Rhoades Canyon. Our new house was added to by a hard dug basement and a bowery connecting the two.

I believe the largest families which moved out there were the Whites, Maxwells and the Michies and several others... During the following years quite a number of new families moved into our area. L.W. Clark and family from Salt Lake had bought a ranch just north of Tabby. He was a professor of music. We needed an organ. So Father ... agreed to get an organ.

Father and I went to Salt Lake, Father listened to several organs demonstrated by Consolidated Music Company... He picked out an organ, [which] according to his judgement was the best. It was a long dusty haul from Salt Lake City to Tabby. When we arrived, Brother Clark looked the organ over and said, “Brother White, you couldn’t have bought a better organ.” It was made by Lester. Music kept our ward alive during many later years.

Father loaned the Church all the sawed ten by ten logs to build the shurch house... Father worked right along with all the builders as well. I think Brother maxwell built and furnished all the casing for the ward house. He was a good carpenter. John Barbari, who was [an] Italian non-member from Sicily had money and a good number of cattle... [He] was persuaded to buy the doors and windows.

Later on, in about 1913, it became necessary to incorporate a township. A forty-acre piece of good land was for sale. Father bid on the forty acres for the town, but was out bid by twenty-five cents per acre by George Fisher. It didn’t take those concerned long to arrange with Mr. Fisher for the forty acres, which became the town of Tabiona.

During the winter of 1913-1914, just before Christmas, the ward house was sawed in half and loaded on four strong wagons pulled by plenty of horses. It was moved down to a town lot in Tabiona to make a ward and school house combined.

In the earliest years, there was one road down the center of the valley. We first lived about one quarter miles from the river. We carried our water by buckets. On was day we took a two-log sled, a sixty gallon barrel and a horse to haul our water.

In about 1908, a terrible could burst came to our area and about flooded us all down the river. Father then built a new house up on a knoll, three quarter of a mile north, where it is to this day, in 1980.

We had quite a number of wild animals to contend with. The coyotes killed many sheep and the mountain lions killed some horses. The most dreaded was the big gray wolf. John Barbari lost seven of his cattle in one night on Black Tail Mountain. There was a sixty dollar bounty then on wolves. ... we had a nice 300 pound heifer come home one fall with a large piece of her ham eaten out. It took us all winter doctoring her. A wolf had bitten off half of her tail. I have wondered how an animal could take a young heifer of this size down and eat out such a meal. When she grew up, there was one teat gone. She was a good milk cow...

Father had been active in the church in the Woodland bishopric and spent most of his life working in the LDS Church.
My father was the first presiding Elder [in Tabiona]. He always drove to Roosevelt every month for his high council meetings. He gave more talks, blessed more babies, confirmed member,etc., I believe, than anyone else. I went through the old Tabiona Ward Records here in Salt Lake and it seemed his name was in them all.

Thomas Adolphus White was born January 1, 1858, in Boston, Massachusetts. He was two years old when they crossed the plains in 1860. They walked almost all the way barefooted. They landed in Cottonwood where grandfather and grandmother lived the balance of their lives. Ann Lambert White was born May 24, 1861, at Sugar House in Salt Lake City. Ann and Adolphus were married in March 1883 in the Salt Lake Endowment House. The moved that year to Bench Creek, across the Provo River, south of Woodland, Utah, and commenced farming. Adolphus died December 12, 1944, at Susanville, California, and Ann died December 31, 1948, at Heber City, Utah. They are both buried at Heber City, Utah.
-------------------------

Andrew Jenson, Encyclopedic History of the Church:

TABIONA WARD, Duchesne Stake, Duchesne Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing on the upper Duchesne River, mostly in a little valley (one of the most beautiful in the Uintah Basin) extending from southwest to northeast along the river. The valley is about ten miles long, with an average width of two miles. The Tabiona townsite is situated on the east side of the river, ten miles southeast of Redcliff, 27 miles northwest of Duchesne, and 45 miles by mountain road southeast of Kamas, Summit Co., Utah. About one-half of the people reside on the Tabiona townsite, and the other half live scattered on their respective farms, strung out on the east side of the river.
Immediately after the Uintah Reservation was opened for white settlers in 1905, Alma W. Wagstaff and others filed on land and built cabins in that part of the country now included in Tabiona Ward. The actual settlement of Tabiona took place in the spring of 1906, when a number of Latter-day Saints located there. A townsite was surveyed on lands which had formerly been owned by the Indian Chief Tabby, and in his honor the place was named Tabbyville, afterwards changed to Tabiona. A branch of the Church was organized at Tabbyville July 24, 1910, with Thomas A. White as presiding Elder. This branch was organized as a regular bishop’s ward Dec. 10, 1911, called Tabiona instead of Tabbyville, with James Simpkins Jones as Bishop. He was succeeded in 1916 by Alma W. Wagstaff, who in 1920 was succeeded by Claude L. Wagstaff, who in 1926 was succeeded by H. Guy Jones, who in 1930 was succeeded by Jessup R. Thomas, who presided Dec. 31, 1930, on which date the Church membership of Tabiona was 341, including 100 children. The total population of the Tabiona Precinct was 277 in 1930.
Census notes for Thomas Adolphus (Spouse 1)
1910 United States Census
State of Utah, County of Wasatch
Stockmore Precinct

White, Thomas A, Head, age 52, mar, born Massachusetts, Farmer
White, Annie, Wife, age 48, mar, born Utah
White, Frank A., Son, age 21, Single, born Utah, Odd Jobs
White, James, Son, age 12, born Utah
White, Pearl, Daughter, age 11, born Utah
White, Talmage, Son, age 8, born Utah
White, Besta, Daughter, age 6, born Utah
White, Bryan, Son, age 4, born Utah
----------------------

1920 United States Census
State of Utah, County of Duchesne
Tabiona

White, Thos. A., Head, age 61, mar, born Massachusetts, Farming
White, Ann M., Wife, age 58, mar, born Utah
White, Vesta, Daughter, age 16, single, born Utah
White, Talmage, Son, age 18, single, born Utah
White, Pearl, Daughter, age 21, single, born Utah
White, Bryan, son, age 14, born Utah
-------------------------

1930 United States Census
State of Utah, County of Duchesne
Oakley

White, Thomas A, Head, age 72, mar, born Massachusetts, parents born England, General Farmer
White, Ann M, Wife, age 68, mar, born Utah, father born England, mother born Ohio
--------------------------
Obituary notes for Thomas Adolphus (Spouse 1)
Newspaper: The Salt Lake Tribune, Salt Lake City, Utah, December 1944, “Obituaries.”
Thomas A. White
MARION, Summit County -- Thomas Adolphus White, 86, died at the home of a daughter, Mrs. Vester Becker, Susanville, Calif., Tuesday after an extended illness, according to word received here.

Surviving are his widow and nine sons and daughters, Mrs. Anna May Ellis, Heber; Mrs. Maggie Mitchell and Mrs. Pearl Lewis, Marion; Frank, James and Talmage White and Mrs. Vesta Becker, Susanville, Calif., Mrs. Minerva Lawson, Rocklin, Calif.; Bryan White, San Anselmo, Calif.; a brother Ethelbert White, Rocklin, Calif.; a sister, Mrs. Lily May Fulton, Los Angeles, 36 grandchildren and 29 great grandchildren.

Funeral services will be conducted Monday at noon in the Marion Ward chapel by bishop Gilbert B. Lewis.
Last Modified 14 Jul 2013Created 9 Jan 2017 using Reunion for Macintosh